Cyber Security/Hacking

Cybersecurity Training Courses

Our vast cyber security training portfolio can help you and your team build fundamental to advanced cyber security techniques, prepare for top industry-recognized certifications or master product-specific skills.

Data breaches are happening at alarming rates. It’s no longer a question of if a breach will happen but when. Cyber security has changed from an IT only issue to an organisational problem that requires C-suite leadership to work with IT professionals to build a resilient workforce and implement new security policies and strategies.

Prepare to detect and contain system breaches with our broad range of product-specific cyber security training and industry-recognized certification prep courses. Hone your skills in key areas such as security awareness, secure coding, web security development and critical infrastructure risk management. From the start to finished, we have you covered with the training you need to manage critical infrastructure risks and meet Department of Defense security mandates.

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Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH v8) (CEH V8)

COURSE OVERVIEW

 

A Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) is a skilled professional who understands and knows how to look for weaknesses and vulnerabilities in target systems. A Ethical Hacker uses the same knowledge and tools as a malicious hacker, but in a lawful and legitimate manner to assess the security posture of a target system(s). The CEH credential certifies individuals in the specific network security discipline of Ethical Hacking from a vendor-neutral perspective.

This course will immerse you into the Hacker Mindset so that you will be able to defend against future attacks. The security mindset in any organization must not be limited to the silos of a certain vendor, technologies or pieces of equipment.

This ethical hacking course puts you in the driver’s seat of a hands-on environment with a systematic process. Here, you will be exposed to an entirely different way of achieving optimal information security posture in their organization; by hacking it! You will scan, test, hack and secure your own systems. You will be taught the five phases of ethical hacking and the ways to approach your target and succeed at breaking in every time! The five phases include Reconnaissance, Gaining Access, Enumeration, Maintaining Access, and covering your tracks.

The Certified Ethical Hacker course is regularly updated to ensure you are aware of the latest tools and techniques used by hackers and information security professionals. .

A Pearson Vue exam voucher is included, although you will need to schedule the exam at a Pearson Vue testing faclity. An additional 6 months access to the CEHv8 (iLabs) is provided once you have completed the course.

DEFINITION:

A Certified Ethical Hacker has obtained a certification in how to look for the weaknesses and vulnerabilities in systems and uses the same information and tools as a hacker does. The code for the CEH exam is 312-50 and the certification is in Version 8.

COURSES OFFERED:

  • Foot-printing and reconnaissance
  • Process of Hacking web servers and wireless networks
  • Cryptography
  • Penetration testing
  • Social engineering
  • Trojans, viruses, and worms
  • Evading IDS, firewalls, and honeypots
  • Enumeration
  • Buffer overflows

DETAILS OF CEH:

  • CEH exam is a relative to the IT certification industry, more specifically its new version but its significance  and influence have grown very quickly.
  • The exam was the first certification to bring  the dark side of IT industry into the limelight which was provided by the International Council of E-Commerce Consultants( EC-Council),
  • Before it, there was no certification that focused on the methods and tools used by hackers to penetrate computer systems & information.
  • The CEH exam focuses on how hackers find and exploit vulnerabilities of a system. It provides a glimpse into the underworld of IT network security.
  • The subject matter tested in the exam includes everything from the tools of the trade to ethics.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES:

  1. CEH certification make you capable of wide range of other jobs in IT in addition to requirement of penetration tester.
  2. CEH significantly helps IT professionals who are seeking a position in the public sector. Various changes have made to many of government bodies which mandates that employees in specific job roles meet certification requirements of those roles.
  3. CEH certification fills requirement for Computer Network Defense workers. As well as for civilians and contractors hoping to land IT positions in government, CEH certification is a vital characteristic to have.
  4. CEH certification covers vivid requirements for  Computer Network Defense (CND) Analyst, CND Infrastructure Support, CND Incident Responder etc.

ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA:

In order to be eligible to attempt EC-Council CEH v8or ECSA v4 certification exams, candidate may choose to :-

Attend Official Training:

If any candidate attends an official instructor-led training (ILT), computer-based training (CBT), online live training, or academic learning, candidate is eligible to attempt the relevant EC-Council exam.

Attempt Exam without Official Training:

In order to be considered for the EC-Council certification exam without attending official training, aspirant:

  • Must have at least experience of two years in information security.
  • Educational Background with specialization in information network & security.
  • Submit a completed copy of Exam Eligibility Application Form.



COURSE OVERVIEW

A Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) is a skilled professional who understands and knows how to look for weaknesses and vulnerabilities in target systems. A Ethical Hacker uses the same knowledge and tools as a malicious hacker, but in a lawful and legitimate manner to assess the security posture of a target system(s). The CEH credential certifies individuals in the specific network security discipline of Ethical Hacking from a vendor-neutral perspective.

This course will immerse you into the Hacker Mindset so that you will be able to defend against future attacks. The security mindset in any organization must not be limited to the silos of a certain vendor, technologies or pieces of equipment.

This ethical hacking course puts you in the driver’s seat of a hands-on environment with a systematic process. Here, you will be exposed to an entirely different way of achieving optimal information security posture in their organization; by hacking it! You will scan, test, hack and secure your own systems. You will be taught the five phases of ethical hacking and the ways to approach your target and succeed at breaking in every time! The five phases include Reconnaissance, Gaining Access, Enumeration, Maintaining Access, and covering your tracks.

The Certified Ethical Hacker course is regularly updated to ensure you are aware of the latest tools and techniques used by hackers and information security professionals. .

A Pearson Vue exam voucher is included, although you will need to schedule the exam at a Pearson Vue testing faclity. An additional 6 months access to the CEHv8 (iLabs) is provided once you have completed the course.

TARGET AUDIENCE

The Certified Ethical Hacking training course will significantly benefit security officers, auditors, security professionals, site administrators, and anyone who is concerned about the integrity of the network infrastructure.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

During this course you should learn the:

  • Key issues plaguing the information security world, incident management process, and penetration testing.
  • Various types of footprinting, footprinting tools, and countermeasures.
  • Network scanning techniques and scanning countermeasures.
  • Enumeration techniques and enumeration countermeasures.
  • System hacking methodology, steganography, steganalysis attacks, and covering tracks.
  • Different types of Trojans, Trojan analysis, and Trojan countermeasures.
  • Working of viruses, virus analysis, computer worms, malware analysis procedure, and countermeasures.
  • Packet sniffing techniques and how to defend against sniffing.
  • Social Engineering techniques, identify theft, and social engineering countermeasures.
  • DoS/DDoS attack techniques, botnets, DDoS attack tools, and DoS/DDoS countermeasures.
  • Session hijacking techniques and countermeasures.
  • Different types of webserver attacks, attack methodology, and countermeasures.
  • Different types of web application attacks, web application hacking methodology, and countermeasures.
  • SQL injection attacks and injection detection tools.
  • Wireless Encryption, wireless hacking methodology, wireless hacking tools, and Wi-Fi security tools.
  • Mobile platform attack vector, android vulnerabilities, mobile security guidelines, and tools.
  • Firewall, IDS and honeypot evasion techniques, evasion tools, and countermeasures.
  • Various cloud computing concepts, threats, attacks, and security techniques and tools.
  • Different types of cryptography ciphers, Public Key Infrastructure (PKI), cryptography attacks, and cryptanalysis tools.
  • Various types of penetration testing, security audit, vulnerability assessment, and penetration testing roadmap.
  • Perform vulnerability analysis to identify security loopholes in the target organization’s network, communication infrastructure, and end systems.
  • Different threats to IoT platforms and learn how to defend IoT devices securely.

COURSE CONTENT

Introduction to Ethical Hacking

  • Information Security Overview
  • Information Security Threats and Attack Vectors
  • Hacking Concepts
  • Ethical Hacking Concepts
  • Information Security Controls
  • Penetration Testing Concepts
  • Information Security Laws and Standards

Footprinting and Reconnaissance

  • Footprinting Concepts
  • Footprinting through Search Engines
  • Footprinting through Web Services
  • Footprinting through Social Networking Sites
  • Website Footprinting
  • Email Footprinting
  • Competitive Intelligence
  • Whois Footprinting
  • DNS Footprinting
  • Network Footprinting
  • Footprinting through Social Engineering
  • Footprinting Tools
  • Countermeasures
  • Footprinting Pen Testing

Scanning Networks

  • Network Scanning Concepts
  • Scanning Tools
  • Scanning Techniques
  • Scanning Beyond IDS and Firewall
  • Banner Grabbing
  • Draw Network Diagrams
  • Scanning Pen Testing

Enumeration

  • Enumeration Concepts
  • NetBIOS Enumeration
  • SNMP Enumeration
  • LDAP Enumeration
  • NTP Enumeration
  • SMTP and DNS Enumeration
  • Other Enumeration Techniques
  • Enumeration Countermeasures
  • Enumeration Pen Testing

Vulnerability Analysis

  • Vulnerability Assessment Concepts
  • Vulnerability Assessment Solutions
  • Vulnerability Scoring Systems
  • Vulnerability Assessment Tools
  • Vulnerability Assessment Reports

System Hacking

  • System Hacking Concepts
  • Cracking Passwords
  • Escalating Privileges
  • Executing Applications
  • Hiding Files
  • Covering Tracks
  • Penetration Testing

Malware Threats

  • Malware Concepts
  • Trojan Concepts
  • Virus and Worm Concepts
  • Malware Analysis
  • Countermeasures
  • Anti-Malware Software
  • Malware Penetration Testing

Sniffing

  • Sniffing Concepts
  • Sniffing Technique: MAC Attacks
  • Sniffing Technique: DHCP Attacks
  • Sniffing Technique: ARP Poisoning
  • Sniffing Technique: Spoofing Attacks
  • Sniffing Technique: DNS Poisoning
  • Sniffing Tools
  • Countermeasures
  • Sniffing Detection Techniques
  • Sniffing Pen Testing

Social Engineering

  • Social Engineering Concepts
  • Social Engineering Techniques
  • Insider Threats
  • Impersonation on Social Networking Sites
  • Identity Theft
  • Countermeasures
  • Social Engineering Pen Testing

Denial-of-Service

  • DoS/DDoS Concepts
  • DoS/DDoS Attack Techniques
  • Botnets
  • DDoS Case Study
  • DoS/DDoS Attack Tools
  • Countermeasures
  • DoS/DDoS Protection Tools
  • DoS/DDoS Penetration Testing

Session Hijacking

  • Session Hijacking Concepts
  • Application Level Session Hijacking
  • Network Level Session Hijacking
  • Session Hijacking Tools
  • Countermeasures
  • Penetration Testing

Evading IDS, Firewalls, and Honeypots

  • IDS, Firewall and Honeypot Concepts
  • IDS, Firewall and Honeypot Solutions
  • Evading IDS
  • Evading Firewalls
  • IDS/Firewall Evading Tools
  • Detecting Honeypots
  • IDS/Firewall Evasion Countermeasures
  • Penetration Testing

Hacking Web Servers

  • Web Server Concepts
  • Web Server Attacks
  • Web Server Attack Methodology
  • Web Server Attack Tools
  • Countermeasures
  • Patch Management
  • Web Server Security Tools
  • Web Server Pen Testing

Hacking Web Applications

  • Web App Concepts
  • Web App Threats
  • Hacking Methodology
  • Web App Hacking Tools
  • Countermeasures
  • Web App Security Testing Tools
  • Web App Pen Testing

SQL Injection

  • SQL Injection Concepts
  • Types of SQL Injection
  • SQL Injection Methodology
  • SQL Injection Tools
  • Evasion Techniques
  • Countermeasures

Hacking Wireless Networks

  • Wireless Concepts
  • Wireless Encryption
  • Wireless Threats
  • Wireless Hacking Methodology
  • Wireless Hacking Tools
  • Bluetooth Hacking
  • Countermeasures
  • Wireless Security Tools
  • Wireless Pen Testing

Hacking Mobile Platforms

  • Mobile Platform Attack Vectors
  • Hacking Android OS
  • Hacking iOS
  • Mobile Spyware
  • Mobile Device Management
  • Mobile Security Guidelines and Tools
  • Mobile Pen Testing

IoT Hacking

  • IoT Concepts
  • IoT Attacks
  • IoT Hacking Methodology
  • IoT Hacking Tools
  • Countermeasures
  • IoT Pen Testing

Cloud Computing

  • Cloud Computing Concepts
  • Cloud Computing Threats
  • Cloud Computing Attacks
  • Cloud Security
  • Cloud Security Tools
  • Cloud Penetration Testing

Cryptography

  • Cryptography Concepts
  • Encryption Algorithms
  • Cryptography Tools
  • Public Key Infrastructure (PKI)
  • Email Encryption
  • Disk Encryption
  • Cryptanalysis
  • Countermeasures

COURSE PREREQUISITES

Attendees should meet the following prerequisites:

  • Have two years’ IT work experience and a possess a basic familiarity of Linux and/or Unix.
  • A strong working knowledge of:
    • TCP/IP
    • Windows Server

4 Hours Daily 3 Times a Week

Total Duration 6 Weeks


₵2,000.00
Reverse-Engineering Malware: Malware Analysis Tools and Techniques (Cyber Security)

SKY610: Reverse-Engineering Malware: Malware Analysis Tools and Techniques

If you want to be a serious DFIR expert and look like a wizard, know memeory forensics.

Yinan Yang, EY

High valuable content that has immediately boosted my skills. The day 6 CTF was awesome.

Rafe Pilling, Dell Secureworks



Learn to turn malware inside out! This popular course explores malware analysis tools and techniques in depth. SKY610 training has helped forensic investigators, incident responders, security engineers, and IT administrators acquire the practical skills to examine malicious programs that target and infect Windows systems.

Understanding the capabilities of malware is critical to an organization's ability to derive threat intelligence, respond to information security incidents, and fortify defenses. This course builds a strong foundation for reverse-engineering malicious software using a variety of system and network monitoring utilities, a disassembler, a debugger, and many other freely available tools.

The course begins by establishing the foundation for analyzing malware in a way that dramatically expands upon the findings of automated analysis tools. You will learn how to set up a flexible laboratory to examine the inner workings of malicious software, and how to use the lab to uncover characteristics of real-world malware samples. You will also learn how to redirect and intercept network traffic in the lab to explore the specimen's capabilities by interacting with the malicious program.

The course continues by discussing essential assembly language concepts relevant to reverse engineering. You will learn to examine malicious code with the help of a disassembler and a debugger in order to understand its key components and execution flow. In addition, you will learn to identify common malware characteristics by looking at suspicious Windows API patterns employed by malicious programs.

Next, you will dive into the world of malware that thrives in the web ecosystem, exploring methods for assessing suspicious websites and de-obfuscating malicious JavaScript to understand the nature of the attack. You will also learn how to analyze malicious Microsoft Office, RTF, and PDF files. Such documents act as a common infection vector as a part of mainstream and targeted attacks. You will also learn how to examine "file-less" malware and malicious PowerShell scripts.

Malware is often obfuscated to hinder analysis efforts, so the course will equip you with the skills to unpack executable files. You will learn how to dump such programs from memory with the help of a debugger and additional specialized tools, and how to rebuild the files' structure to bypass the packer's protection. You will also learn how to examine malware that exhibits rootkit functionality to conceal its presence on the system, employing code analysis and memory forensics approaches to examining these characteristics.

SKY610 malware analysis training also teaches how to handle malicious software that attempts to safeguard itself from analysis. You will learn how to recognize and bypass common self-defensive measures, including code injection, sandbox evasion, flow misdirection, and other measures.

The course culminates with a series of Capture-the-Flag challenges designed to reinforce the techniques learned in class and provide additional opportunities to learn practical, hands-on malware analysis skills in a fun setting.

Hands-on workshop exercises are a critical aspect of this course. They enable you to apply malware analysis techniques by examining malicious software in a controlled and systemic manner. When performing the exercises, you will study the supplied specimens' behavioral patterns and examine key portions of their code. To support these activities, you will receive pre-built Windows and Linux virtual machines that include tools for examining and interacting with malware.

In summary, SKY610 malware analysis training will teach you how to:

  • Build an isolated, controlled laboratory environment for analyzing the code and behavior of malicious programs
  • Employ network and system-monitoring tools to examine how malware interacts with the file system, registry, network, and other processes in a Windows environment
  • Uncover and analyze malicious JavaScript and other components of web pages, which are often used by exploit kits for drive-by attacks
  • Control relevant aspects of the malicious program's behavior through network traffic interception and code patching to perform effective malware analysis
  • Use a disassembler and a debugger to examine the inner workings of malicious Windows executables
  • Bypass a variety of packers and other defensive mechanisms designed by malware authors to misdirect, confuse, and otherwise slow down the analyst
  • Recognize and understand common assembly-level patterns in malicious code, such as code L injection, API hooking, and anti-analysis measures
  • Assess the threat associated with malicious documents, such as PDF and Microsoft Office files
  • Derive Indicators of Compromise (IOCs) from malicious executables to strengthen incident response and threat intelligence efforts.



Notice:

Please plan to arrive 30 minutes early on Day 2 for lab preparation and set-up.

Course Syllabus

  SKY610.1: Malware Analysis Fundamentals
Overview

Section 1 lays the groundwork for malware analysis by presenting the key tools and techniques useful for examining malicious programs. You will learn how to save time by exploring Windows malware in several phases. Static properties analysis examines meta data and other file attributes to perform triage and determine the next course of action. Behavioral analysis focuses on the program's interactions with its environment, such as the registry, file system, and network. Code analysis focuses on the specimen's inner workings and makes use of debugging tools such as x64bg. You will learn how to set up and utilize a flexible laboratory to perform such an analysis in a controlled manner, becoming familiar with the supplied Windows and Linux (REMnux) virtual machines. You will then learn how to use the key analysis tools by examining a malware sample in your lab-with guidance and explanations from the instructor-to reinforce the concepts discussed throughout the day.

The tools introduced in this section include pestr, peframe, PeStudio, Process Hacker, Process Monitor, Regshot, ProcDOT, x64dbg, API Monitor, and INetSim.

CPE/CMU Credits: 6

Topics
  • Assembling a toolkit for effective malware analysis
  • Examining static properties of suspicious programs
  • Performing behavioral analysis of malicious Windows executables
  • Performing static and dynamic code analysis of malicious Windows executables
  • Interacting with malware in a lab to derive additional behavioral characteristics

  SKY610.2: Reversing Malicious Code
Overview

Section 2 focuses on examining malicious Windows executables at the assembly level. You will discover approaches for studying the innards of a specimen by looking at it through a disassembler. The section begins with an overview of key code-reversing concepts and presents a primer on essential x86 Intel assembly concepts, such as instructions, function calls, variables and jumps. You will also learn how to examine common assembly constructs such as functions, loops, and conditional statements. The material will then build on this foundation and expand your understanding to incorporate 64-bit malware, given its growing popularity. Throughout the discussion, you will learn to recognize common characteristics at a code level, including HTTP command and control, keylogging, and command execution.

This section discusses the concepts outlined above while also walking students through the key capabilities of IDA Pro for performing static code analysis.

CPE/CMU Credits: 6

Topics
  • Understanding core x86 assembly concepts to perform malicious code analysis
  • Identifying key assembly logic structures with a disassembler
  • Following program control flow to understand decision points during execution
  • Recognizing common malware characteristics at the Windows API level (registry manipulation, keylogging, HTTP communications, droppers)
  • Extending assembly knowledge to include x64 code analysis

  SKY610.3: Malicious Web and Document Files
Overview

Section 3 focuses on examining malicious web pages and documents, which adversaries can use to directly perform malicious actions on the infected system and launch attacks that lead to the installation of malicious executable files. The section begins by discussing how to examine suspicious websites that might host client-side exploits. Next, you will learn how to de-obfuscate malicious scripts with the help of script debuggers and interpreters, examine Microsoft Office macros, and assess the threats associated with PDF and RTF files using several techniques.

The tools introduced in this section include Fiddler, SpiderMonkey, box-js, base64dump.py, pdf-parser.py, peepdf.py, scdbg, olevba.py, oledump.py, rtfdump.py, and jmp2it.

CPE/CMU Credits: 6

Topics
  • Interacting with malicious websites to assess the nature of their threats
  • De-obfuscating malicious JavaScript using debuggers and interpreters
  • Analyzing suspicious PDF files
  • Examining malicious Microsoft Office documents, including files with macros
  • Analyzing malicious RTF document files

  SKY610.4: In-Depth Malware Analysis
Overview

Section 4 builds on the approaches to behavioral and code analysis introduced earlier in the course, exploring techniques for uncovering additional aspects of the functionality of malicious programs. The section begins by discussing how to handle packed malware. We will examine ways to identify packers and strip away their protection with the help of a debugger and other utilities. We will also walk through the analysis of malware that employs multiple technologies to conceal its true nature, including the use of registry, obfuscated JavaScript and PowerShell scripts, and shellcode. Finally, we will learn how malware implements Usermode rootkit functionality to perform code injection and API hooking, examining this functionality from both code and memory forensics perspectives.

The tools introduced in this section include Detect It Easy, Exeinfo Pe, Bytehist, CFF Explorer, Scylla, OllyDumpEx, ands Volatility.

CPE/CMU Credits: 6

Topics
  • Recognizing packed malware
  • Getting started with unpacking
  • Using debuggers for dumping packed malware from memory
  • Analyzing multi-technology and file-less malware
  • Code injection and API hooking
  • Using memory forensics for malware analysis

SKY610.5: Examining Self-Defending Malware
Overview

Section 5 takes a close look at the techniques malware authors commonly employ to protect malicious software from being examined. You will learn how to recognize and bypass anti-analysis measures designed to slow you down or misdirect you. In the process, you will gain more experience performing static and dynamic analysis of malware that is able to unpack or inject itself into other processes. You will also expand your understanding of how malware authors safeguard the data that they embed inside malicious executables. As with the other topics covered throughout the course, you will be able to experiment with such techniques during hands-on exercises.

This section brings together many of the tools covered earlier in the course, including IDA Pro and x64dbg/x32dbg. It also introduces FLOSS, bbcrack.py, ScyllaHide, and pe_unmapper, among others.

CPE/CMU Credits: 6

Topics
  • How malware detects debuggers and protects embedded data
  • Unpacking malicious software that employs process hollowing
  • Bypassing the attempts by malware to detect and evade the analysis toolkit
  • Handling code misdirection techniques, including SEH and TLS Callbacks
  • Unpacking malicious executable by anticipating the packer's actions

 

SKY610.6: Malware Analysis Tournament
Overview

Section 6 assigns students to the role of a malware analyst working as a member of an incident response or forensics team. Students are presented with a variety of hands-on challenges involving real-world malware in the context of a fun tournament. These challenges further a student's ability to respond to typical malware analysis tasks in an instructor-led lab environment and offer additional learning opportunities. Moreover, the challenges are designed to reinforce skills covered in the first five sections of the course, making use of the popular SkyWatch NetWars educational platform. By applying the techniques learned earlier in the course, students consolidate their knowledge and shore up skill areas where they feel they need additional practice. Students who score the highest in the malware analysis challenge will be awarded the coveted.

CPE/CMU Credits: 6

Topics
  • Behavioral malware analysis
  • Dynamic malware analysis (using a debugger)
  • Static malware analysis (using a disassembler)
  • JavaScript de-obfuscation
  • PDF document analysis
  • Office document analysis
  • Memory analysis

Additional Information

  Laptop Required

A properly configured system is required to fully participate in this course. These requirements are the mandatory minimums. If you do not carefully read and follow these instructions, you will likely leave the class unsatisfied because you will not be able to participate in hands-on exercises that are essential to this course. Therefore, you must arrive to class with a system meeting all the requirements specified below.

This is common sense, but we will say it anyway: Back up your system before class. Better yet, do not have any sensitive data stored on the system. SANS can't responsible for your system or data.

MANDATORY SKY610 SYSTEM HARDWARE REQUIREMENTS:

  • CPU: 64-bit Intel i5/i7 (4th generation+) - x64 bit 2.0+ GHz processor or more recent processor is mandatory for this class. Important - Please Read: a 64-bit system processor is mandatory.
  • It is critical that your CPU and operating system support 64-bit so that our 64-bit guest virtual machines will run on your laptop. VMware provides a free tool for Windows that will detect whether or not your host supports 64-bit guest virtual machines. For further troubleshooting, this article also provides good instructions for Windows users to determine more about the CPU and OS capabilities. For Macs, please use this support page from Apple to determine 64-bit capability.
  • BIOS settings must be set to enable virtualization technology, such as "Intel-VT". Be absolutely certain you can access your BIOS if it is password protected, in case changes are necessary. Test it before class!
  • 16 GB (Gigabytes) of RAM or higher is mandatory for this class Important - Please Read: 16 GB of RAM or higher of RAM is mandatory and minimum.
  • USB 3.0 Type-A port is required. At least one open and working USB 3.0 Type-A port is required. Therefore, a Type-C to Type-A adapter may be necessary for newer laptops. Some endpoint protection software prevents the use of USB devices - test your system with a USB drive before class to ensure you can load the course data.
  • 200 Gigabytes of Free Space on your System Hard Drive. Free Space on Hard Drive is critical to host the VMs we distribute.
  • Local Administrator access is required. This is absolutely required. Don't let your IT team tell you otherwise. If your company will not permit this access for the duration of the course, then you should make arrangements to bring a different laptop.
  • Wi-Fi 802.11 capability is mandatory. You'll need to connect to an in-class Wi-Fi network when participating in this course at a life event. Without working Wi-Fi, you'll be unable to participating in important aspects of the course.

MANDATORY SKY610 HOST CONFIGURATION AND SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS:

  • Host Operating System: Your system must be running either Windows 10 Pro, Linux or macOS 10.14 or later that also can install and run VMware virtualization products described below.
  • It is necessary to fully update your host operating system prior to the class to ensure you have the right drivers and patches installed to utilize the latest USB 3.0 devices.
  • Those who use a Linux host must also be able to access exFAT partitions using the appropriate kernel or FUSE modules.
  • Download and install 7-Zip (for Windows Hosts) or Keka (macOS). Without these extraction tools, you'll be unable to extract large archives we'll supply to you in class.

INSTALL VMWARE "PRO" SOFTWARE:

  • Download and install VMware Workstation 15.5 Pro, VMware Fusion 11.5 Pro or higher versions before class. If you do not own a licensed copy of VMware Workstation or Fusion, you can download a free 30-day trial copy from VMware. VMware will send you a time-limited serial number if you register for the trial at their website.
  • You must get the versions of the products that have "Pro" in their name. he free non-Pro versions of these products (e.g., VMware Workstation Player) are not sufficient for this course because they do not support snapshot functionality, which we will need to use.
  • Other virtualization software, such as VirtualBox and Hyper-V, are not appropriate because of compatibility and troubleshooting problems you might encounter during class.
  • VMware Workstation Pro on Windows 10 is not compatible with Windows 10 Credential Guard and Device Guard technologies. Please disable these capabilities for the duration of the class, if they're enabled on your system, by following instructions from VMware.

If you have additional questions about the laptop specifications, please contact us.

 Who Should Attend

SKY610 acts as a practical on-ramp into the world of malware analysis. It is useful both for individuals looking to enter this exciting field, as well as for those who seek to formalize and expand their skills in this area. Attendees who have found this course especially useful often have responsibilities in the areas of incident response, forensic investigation, information security, threat intelligence, and threat hunting. Course participants have included:

  • Individuals who have dealt with incidents involving malware and wanted to learn how to understand key aspects of malicious programs.
  • Technologists who have informally experimented with aspects of malware analysis prior to the course and were looking to formalize and expand their expertise in this area.
  • Forensic investigators and security practitioners looking to expand their skillsets and learn how to play a pivotal role in the incident response process.
  • Security Analyst
  • Security Architect
  • Security Engineer
  • Security Consultant
  • Security Systems Administrator
  • Network Security Engineer/ Analyst
  • Risk/ Vulnerability Analyst
  • Computer Forensic Analyst
  • Computer Network Defender
  • Computer Network Defense Analyst
  • Web Application Security Engineer
  • Forensic Analyst
  • Digital Forensic Examiner

The course begins by covering malware analysis at an introductory level, then quickly progresses to discussing tools and techniques of intermediate complexity. Neither programming experience nor knowledge of assembly is required to benefit from the course. However, you should have a general idea about core programming concepts such as variables, loops, and functions, so you can quickly grasp the relevant concepts in this area. The course spends some time discussing essential aspects of the assembly language, allowing malware analysts to navigate through malicious executables using a disassembler and a debugger.


Prerequisites

SKY610 attendees should:

  • Have a computer system that matches the stated laptop requirements; some software needs to be installed before students come to class.
  • Be familiar with using Windows and Linux operating environments and be able to troubleshoot general OS connectivity and setup issues.
  • Be familiar with VMware and be able to import and configure virtual machines.
  • Have a general idea about core programming concepts such as variables, loops, and functions in order to quickly grasp the relevant concepts in this area; however, no programming experience is necessary.

Why Take This Course?
Why Choose Our Course?

The malware analysis process taught in SKY610 helps incident responders and other security professionals assess the severity and repercussions of a situation that involves malicious software so that they can plan recovery steps. Forensics investigators also learn about the key characteristics of malware discovered during the examination, including how to establish Indicators of Compromise and obtain other threat intelligence details for analyzing, scoping, and containing the incident.

What threat does the malicious or suspicious program pose? What do its mechanics reveal about the adversary's goals and capabilities? How effective are the company's security controls against such infections? What security measures can strengthen the organization's infrastructure from future attacks of this nature? This course teaches the skills necessary to answer these and other questions critical to an organization's ability to handle malware threats and related incidents.



  What You Will Receive

When attending SKY610, you will receive a USB key-based toolkit packed with helpful malware analysis tools. You will use them to perform exercises in class, and you can also use them later to interrogate suspicious files when you return to your job. The tools have been preinstalled and configured for your convenience into two virtual machines that you will receive in the course toolkit:

  • A Windows REM Workstation virtual machine with preinstalled analysis tools, along with the corresponding Microsoft Windows license.
  • A REMnux virtual machine set up to run the lightweight Linux distribution used by many malware analysts world-wide.

The toolkit also includes many real-world malware samples that you will examine during the course when performing hands-on lab exercises, as well as MP3 audio files of the complete course lectures.

You will also receive printed training materials with detailed explanations and illustrations of the concepts, tools, and techniques covered in the course. The materials include a workbook that provides detailed, step-by-step instructions for all the hands-on lab exercises performed in the course to facilitate the learning experience.

Program Summary

DURATION

5 Days

On Demand

₵1,500.00
Certified Network Defender (CND) (CND)

Certified Network Defender Certification

The Certified Network Defender (CND) certification program focuses on creating Network Administrators who are trained on protecting, detecting and responding to the threats on the network. Network administrators are usually familiar with network components, traffic, performance and utilization, network topology, location of each system, security policy, etc. A CND will get the fundamental understanding of the true construct of data transfer, network technologies, software technologies so that the they understand how networks operate, understand what software is automating and how to analyze the subject material. In addition, network defense fundamentals, the application of network security controls, protocols, perimeter appliances, secure IDS, VPN and firewall configuration, intricacies of network traffic signature, analysis and vulnerability scanning are also covered which will help the Network Administrator design greater network security policies and successful incident response plans..

CND is a skills-based, lab intensive program based on a job-task analysis and cybersecurity education framework presented by the SkyWatch Technology Institute.

TARGET AUDIENCE

  • Network Administrators
  • Network security Administrators
  • Network Security Engineer
  • Network Defense Technicians
  • CND Analyst
  • Security Analyst
  • Security Operator
  • Anyone who involves in network operations

The purpose of the CND credential is to:

Validate the skills that will help the Network Administrators foster resiliency and continuity of operations during attacks.

About the Exam

  • Number of Questions: 100
  • Test Duration: 4 Hours
  • Test Format: Multiple Choice
  • Test Delivery: ECC EXAM
  • Exam Prefix: 312-38 (ECC EXAM)

Passing Score

In order to maintain the high integrity of our certifications exams, EC-Council Exams are provided in multiple forms (I.e. different question banks). Each form is carefully analyzed through beta testing with an appropriate sample group under the purview of a committee of subject matter experts that ensure that each of our exams not only has academic rigor but also has “real world” applicability. We also have a process to determine the difficulty rating of each question. The individual rating then contributes to an overall “Cut Score” for each exam form. To ensure each form has equal assessment standards, cut scores are set on a “per exam form” basis. Depending on which exam form is challenged, cut scores can range from 60% to 85%.


CERTIFIED NETWORK DEFENDER PROGRAM

Organizational focus on cyber defense is more important than ever as cyber breaches have a far greater financial impact and can cause broad reputational damage.

Despite best efforts to prevent breaches, many organizations are still being compromised. Therefore organizations must have, as part of their defense mechanisms, trained network engineers who are focused on protecting, detecting, and responding to the threats on their networks.

Network administrators spends a lot of time with network environments, and are familiar with network components, traffic, performance and utilization, network topology, location of each system, security policy, etc.

So, organizations can be much better in defending themselves from vicious attacks if the IT and network administrators equipped with adequate network security skills .Thus Network administrator can play a significant role in network defense and become first line of defense for any organizations.

There is no proper tactical network security training that is made available for network administrators which provides them core network security skills.


Students enrolled in the Certified Network Defender course, will gain a detailed understanding and hands on ability to function in real life situations involving network defense. They will gain the technical depth required to actively design a secure network in your organization. This program will be akin to learning math instead of just using a calculator. This course gives you the fundamental understanding of the true construct of data transfer, network technologies, software technologies so that you understand how networks operate, understand what software is automating and how to analyze the subject material.

You will learn how to protect, detect and respond to the network attacks. You will learn network defense fundamentals, the application of network security controls, protocols, perimeter appliances, secure IDS, VPN and firewall configuration. You will then learn the intricacies of network traffic signature, analysis and vulnerability scanning which will help you when you design greater network security policies and successful incident response plans. These skills will help you foster resiliency and continuity of operations during attacks.


Price Includes International Curriculum Courseware And Very Active Real-Time Labs.

2 Hours Daily 3 Times a Week

Total Duration 4 Months

Prerequisites

  • CompTIA N+ certification knowledge
  • CompTIA A+ certification knowledge
  • Linux Administrator certification knowledge
  • MCSA: Windows Server 2012 R2 Certification
  • CCNA V3
₵2,500.00
CompTIA Pentest+ (Pentest+)

COURSE OVERVIEW

As organisations scramble to protect themselves and their customers against privacy or security breaches, the ability to conduct penetration testing is an emerging skill set that is becoming ever more valuable to the organisations seeking protection, and ever more lucrative for those who possess these skills. In this course, you will be introduced to general concepts and methodologies related to pen testing, and you will work your way through a simulated pen test for a fictitious company.

The CompTIA PenTest+ certification requires a candidate to demonstrate the hands-on ability and knowledge to test devices in new environments such as the cloud and mobile, in addition to traditional desktops and servers. 

CompTIA PenTest+ joins CompTIA Cybersecurity Analyst (CySA+) at the intermediate-skills level of the cybersecurity career pathway as shown below. Depending on your course of study, PenTest+ and CySA+ can be taken in any order but typically follows the skills learned in Security+. While CySA+ focuses on defense through incident detection and response, PenTest+ focuses on offense through penetration testing and vulnerability assessment.

Although the two exams teach opposing skills, they are dependent on one another. The most qualified cybersecurity professionals have both offensive and defensive skills. Earn the PenTest+ certification to grow your career within the CompTIA recommended cybersecurity career pathway. 

TARGET AUDIENCE

Cybersecurity professionals involved in hands-on penetration testing to identify, exploit, report, and manage vulnerabilities on a network.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

After completing this course you should be able to:

  • Explain the importance of planning and key aspects of compliance-based assessments.
  • Conduct information gathering exercises with various tools and analyse output and basic scripts (limited to: Bash, Python, Ruby, PowerShell).
  • Gather information to prepare for exploitation then perform a vulnerability scan and analyse results.
  • Utilise report writing and handling best practices explaining recommended mitigation strategies for discovered vulnerabilities.
  • Exploit network, wireless, application, and RF-based vulnerabilities, summarize physical security attacks, and perform post-exploitation techniques.

COURSE CONTENT

Planning and Scoping Penetration Tests

  • Introduction to Penetration Testing Concepts
  • Plan a Pen Test Engagement
  • Scope and Negotiate a Pen Test Engagement
  • Prepare for a Pen Test Engagement

Conducting Passive Reconnaissance

  • Gather Background Information
  • Prepare Background Findings for Next Steps

Performing Non-Technical Tests

  • Perform Social Engineering Tests
  • Perform Physical Security Tests on Facilities

Conducting Active Reconnaissance

  • Scan Networks
  • Enumerate Targets
  • Scan for Vulnerabilities
  • Analyze Basic Scripts

Analyzing Vulnerabilities

  • Analyze Vulnerability Scan Results
  • Leverage Information to Prepare for Exploitation

Penetrating Networks

  • Exploit Network-Based Vulnerabilities
  • Exploit Wireless and RF-Based Vulnerabilities
  • Exploit Specialized Systems

Exploiting Host-Based Vulnerabilities

  • Exploit Windows-Based Vulnerabilities
  • Exploit *Nix-Based Vulnerabilities

Testing Applications

  • Exploit Web Application Vulnerabilities
  • Test Source Code and Compiled Apps

Completing Post-Exploit Tasks

  • Use Lateral Movement Techniques
  • Use Persistence Techniques
  • Use Anti-Forensics Techniques

Analyzing and Reporting Pen Test Results

  • Analyze Pen Test Data
  • Develop Recommendations for Mitigation Strategies
  • Write and Handle Reports
  • Conduct Post-Report-Delivery Activities

Appendix A: Mapping Course Content to CompTIA PenTest+ (Exam PT0-001) Solutions Glossary Index

COURSE PREREQUISITES

Attendees should meet the following prerequisites:

  • Intermediate knowledge of information security concepts, including but not limited to identity and access management (IAM), cryptographic concepts and implementations, computer networking concepts and implementations, and common security technologies.
  • Practical experience in securing various computing environments, including small to medium businesses, as well as enterprise environments.
  • CompTIA Network + or CompTIA Security + or equivalent knowledge
  • Hands-on information security experience

TEST CERTIFICATION

Recommended as preparation for the following exams:

  • PT0-001 - CompTIA Pentest+ Certification

FOLLOW ON COURSES

The following courses are recommended for further study.

  • GK5867 - CompTIA CySA+ Cybersecurity Analyst

FOLLOW ON COURSES

  • CompTIA Advanced Security Practitioner (CASP+)
  • CompTIA CySA+ Cybersecurity Analyst


Schedule for CompTIA Pentest+ Training
CourseExam
CompTIA Pentest+EXAM CODE PT0-001

2 Hours Daily 3 Times a Week


Total Duration 3 Months


Recommended Courses and Certification:
  • Career Enabler™ - Linux Administrator
  • Career Enabler™ : CISCO (Network & Security)
  • CompTIA Security+
  • Linux+
  • RHCE
  • Server+
₵2,500.00
Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH v10) (CEH V10)

COURSE OVERVIEW

A Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) is a skilled professional who understands and knows how to look for weaknesses and vulnerabilities in target systems. A Ethical Hacker uses the same knowledge and tools as a malicious hacker, but in a lawful and legitimate manner to assess the security posture of a target system(s). The CEH credential certifies individuals in the specific network security discipline of Ethical Hacking from a vendor-neutral perspective.

This course will immerse you into the Hacker Mindset so that you will be able to defend against future attacks. The security mindset in any organization must not be limited to the silos of a certain vendor, technologies or pieces of equipment.

This ethical hacking course puts you in the driver’s seat of a hands-on environment with a systematic process. Here, you will be exposed to an entirely different way of achieving optimal information security posture in their organization; by hacking it! You will scan, test, hack and secure your own systems. You will be taught the five phases of ethical hacking and the ways to approach your target and succeed at breaking in every time! The five phases include Reconnaissance, Gaining Access, Enumeration, Maintaining Access, and covering your tracks.

The Certified Ethical Hacker course is regularly updated to ensure you are aware of the latest tools and techniques used by hackers and information security professionals. .

A Pearson Vue exam voucher is included, although you will need to schedule the exam at a Pearson Vue testing faclity. An additional 6 months access to the CEHv10 (iLabs) is provided once you have completed the course.

TARGET AUDIENCE

The Certified Ethical Hacking training course will significantly benefit security officers, auditors, security professionals, site administrators, and anyone who is concerned about the integrity of the network infrastructure.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

During this course you should learn the:

  • Key issues plaguing the information security world, incident management process, and penetration testing.
  • Various types of footprinting, footprinting tools, and countermeasures.
  • Network scanning techniques and scanning countermeasures.
  • Enumeration techniques and enumeration countermeasures.
  • System hacking methodology, steganography, steganalysis attacks, and covering tracks.
  • Different types of Trojans, Trojan analysis, and Trojan countermeasures.
  • Working of viruses, virus analysis, computer worms, malware analysis procedure, and countermeasures.
  • Packet sniffing techniques and how to defend against sniffing.
  • Social Engineering techniques, identify theft, and social engineering countermeasures.
  • DoS/DDoS attack techniques, botnets, DDoS attack tools, and DoS/DDoS countermeasures.
  • Session hijacking techniques and countermeasures.
  • Different types of webserver attacks, attack methodology, and countermeasures.
  • Different types of web application attacks, web application hacking methodology, and countermeasures.
  • SQL injection attacks and injection detection tools.
  • Wireless Encryption, wireless hacking methodology, wireless hacking tools, and Wi-Fi security tools.
  • Mobile platform attack vector, android vulnerabilities, mobile security guidelines, and tools.
  • Firewall, IDS and honeypot evasion techniques, evasion tools, and countermeasures.
  • Various cloud computing concepts, threats, attacks, and security techniques and tools.
  • Different types of cryptography ciphers, Public Key Infrastructure (PKI), cryptography attacks, and cryptanalysis tools.
  • Various types of penetration testing, security audit, vulnerability assessment, and penetration testing roadmap.
  • Perform vulnerability analysis to identify security loopholes in the target organization’s network, communication infrastructure, and end systems.
  • Different threats to IoT platforms and learn how to defend IoT devices securely.

COURSE CONTENT

Introduction to Ethical Hacking

  • Information Security Overview
  • Information Security Threats and Attack Vectors
  • Hacking Concepts
  • Ethical Hacking Concepts
  • Information Security Controls
  • Penetration Testing Concepts
  • Information Security Laws and Standards

Footprinting and Reconnaissance

  • Footprinting Concepts
  • Footprinting through Search Engines
  • Footprinting through Web Services
  • Footprinting through Social Networking Sites
  • Website Footprinting
  • Email Footprinting
  • Competitive Intelligence
  • Whois Footprinting
  • DNS Footprinting
  • Network Footprinting
  • Footprinting through Social Engineering
  • Footprinting Tools
  • Countermeasures
  • Footprinting Pen Testing

Scanning Networks

  • Network Scanning Concepts
  • Scanning Tools
  • Scanning Techniques
  • Scanning Beyond IDS and Firewall
  • Banner Grabbing
  • Draw Network Diagrams
  • Scanning Pen Testing

Enumeration

  • Enumeration Concepts
  • NetBIOS Enumeration
  • SNMP Enumeration
  • LDAP Enumeration
  • NTP Enumeration
  • SMTP and DNS Enumeration
  • Other Enumeration Techniques
  • Enumeration Countermeasures
  • Enumeration Pen Testing

Vulnerability Analysis

  • Vulnerability Assessment Concepts
  • Vulnerability Assessment Solutions
  • Vulnerability Scoring Systems
  • Vulnerability Assessment Tools
  • Vulnerability Assessment Reports

System Hacking

  • System Hacking Concepts
  • Cracking Passwords
  • Escalating Privileges
  • Executing Applications
  • Hiding Files
  • Covering Tracks
  • Penetration Testing

Malware Threats

  • Malware Concepts
  • Trojan Concepts
  • Virus and Worm Concepts
  • Malware Analysis
  • Countermeasures
  • Anti-Malware Software
  • Malware Penetration Testing

Sniffing

  • Sniffing Concepts
  • Sniffing Technique: MAC Attacks
  • Sniffing Technique: DHCP Attacks
  • Sniffing Technique: ARP Poisoning
  • Sniffing Technique: Spoofing Attacks
  • Sniffing Technique: DNS Poisoning
  • Sniffing Tools
  • Countermeasures
  • Sniffing Detection Techniques
  • Sniffing Pen Testing

Social Engineering

  • Social Engineering Concepts
  • Social Engineering Techniques
  • Insider Threats
  • Impersonation on Social Networking Sites
  • Identity Theft
  • Countermeasures
  • Social Engineering Pen Testing

Denial-of-Service

  • DoS/DDoS Concepts
  • DoS/DDoS Attack Techniques
  • Botnets
  • DDoS Case Study
  • DoS/DDoS Attack Tools
  • Countermeasures
  • DoS/DDoS Protection Tools
  • DoS/DDoS Penetration Testing

Session Hijacking

  • Session Hijacking Concepts
  • Application Level Session Hijacking
  • Network Level Session Hijacking
  • Session Hijacking Tools
  • Countermeasures
  • Penetration Testing

Evading IDS, Firewalls, and Honeypots

  • IDS, Firewall and Honeypot Concepts
  • IDS, Firewall and Honeypot Solutions
  • Evading IDS
  • Evading Firewalls
  • IDS/Firewall Evading Tools
  • Detecting Honeypots
  • IDS/Firewall Evasion Countermeasures
  • Penetration Testing

Hacking Web Servers

  • Web Server Concepts
  • Web Server Attacks
  • Web Server Attack Methodology
  • Web Server Attack Tools
  • Countermeasures
  • Patch Management
  • Web Server Security Tools
  • Web Server Pen Testing

Hacking Web Applications

  • Web App Concepts
  • Web App Threats
  • Hacking Methodology
  • Web App Hacking Tools
  • Countermeasures
  • Web App Security Testing Tools
  • Web App Pen Testing

SQL Injection

  • SQL Injection Concepts
  • Types of SQL Injection
  • SQL Injection Methodology
  • SQL Injection Tools
  • Evasion Techniques
  • Countermeasures

Hacking Wireless Networks

  • Wireless Concepts
  • Wireless Encryption
  • Wireless Threats
  • Wireless Hacking Methodology
  • Wireless Hacking Tools
  • Bluetooth Hacking
  • Countermeasures
  • Wireless Security Tools
  • Wireless Pen Testing

Hacking Mobile Platforms

  • Mobile Platform Attack Vectors
  • Hacking Android OS
  • Hacking iOS
  • Mobile Spyware
  • Mobile Device Management
  • Mobile Security Guidelines and Tools
  • Mobile Pen Testing

IoT Hacking

  • IoT Concepts
  • IoT Attacks
  • IoT Hacking Methodology
  • IoT Hacking Tools
  • Countermeasures
  • IoT Pen Testing

Cloud Computing

  • Cloud Computing Concepts
  • Cloud Computing Threats
  • Cloud Computing Attacks
  • Cloud Security
  • Cloud Security Tools
  • Cloud Penetration Testing

Cryptography

  • Cryptography Concepts
  • Encryption Algorithms
  • Cryptography Tools
  • Public Key Infrastructure (PKI)
  • Email Encryption
  • Disk Encryption
  • Cryptanalysis
  • Countermeasures

COURSE PREREQUISITES

Attendees should meet the following prerequisites:

  • Have two years’ IT work experience and a possess a basic familiarity of Linux and/or Unix.
  • A strong working knowledge of:
    • TCP/IP
    • Windows Server

TEST CERTIFICATION

Recommended as prepartaion for the following exams:

  • 312-50 - Certified Ethical Hacker

 

FOLLOW ON COURSES

The following couses are recommended for further study:

  • Hone and validate your skills further by taking the new CEH (Practical) exam.
  • ECSA - EC-Council Certified Security Analyst (ECSA): Penetration Testing
Schedule for Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH v10) Training
CourseExam
Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH v10)Exam Prefix: 312-50 (ECC EXAM), 312-50 (VUE)

3 Hours Daily 3 Times a Week

Total Duration 4 Months


₵3,500.00
CompTIA CySA+ Cybersecurity Analyst (Cybersecurity Analyst)


TARGET AUDIENCE

The CompTIA Cybersecurity Analyst (CySA+) examination is designed for IT security analysts, vulnerability analysts, or threat intelligence analysts. The exam will certify that the successful candidate has the knowledge and skills required to configure and use threat detection tools, perform data analysis, and interpret the results to identify vulnerabilities, threats, and risks to an organization with the end goal of securing and protecting applications and systems within an organization.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The CompTIA CySA+ certification is a vendor-neutral credential. The CompTIA CySA+ exam (Exam CS0-001) is an internationally targeted validation of intermediate-level security skills and knowledge. The course has a technical, “hands-on” focus on IT security analytics.

The CompTIA CySA+ exam is based on these objectives:
Threat Management
Vulnerability Management

  • Cyber Incident Response
  • Security Architecture and Tool Sets


 

COURSE CONTENT

  • 1. Threat Management
  • Given a scenario, apply environmental reconnaissance techniques using appropriate tools and processes
  • Procedures/common tasks: 
  • Topology discovery 
  • OS fingerprinting 
  • Service discovery 
  • Packet capture 
  • Log review 
  • Router/firewall ACLs review 
  • Email harvesting 
  • Social media profiling 
  • Social engineering 
  • DNS harvesting 
  • Phishing
  • Variables: 
  • Wireless vs. wired 
  • Virtual vs. physical 
  • Internal vs. external 
  •  On-premises vs. cloud
  • Tools:
  •  NMAP 
  •  Host scanning 
  •  Network mapping 
  •  NETSTAT 
  •  Packet analyzer 
  •  IDS/IPS 
  •  HIDS/NIDS 
  •  Firewall rule-based and logs 
  •  Syslog 
  •  Vulnerability scanner
  • Given a scenario, analyze the results of a network reconnaissance
  • Point-in-time data analysis: 
  • Packet analysis 
  • Protocol analysis 
  • Traffic analysis 
  • Netflow analysis 
  • Wireless analysis
  • Data correlation and analytics: 
  • Anomaly analysis 
  • Trend analysis 
  • Availability analysis 
  • Heuristic analysis 
  • Behavioral analysis
  • Data output: 
  • Firewall logs 
  • Packet captures 
  • NMAP scan results 
  • Event logs 
  • Syslogs 
  • IDS report
  • Tools: 
  • SIEM 
  • Packet analyzer 
  • IDS 
  • Resource monitoring tool 
  • Netflow analyzer
  • Given a network-based threat, implement or recommend the appropriate response and countermeasure
  • Network segmentation: 
  • System isolation 
  • Jump box
  • Honeypot
  • Endpoint security
  • Group policies
  • ACLs: 
  • Sinkhole
  • Hardening: 
  • Mandatory Access Control (MAC) 
  • Compensating controls 
  • Blocking unused ports/services 
  • Patching
  • Network Access Control (NAC): 
  • Time-based 
  • Rule-based 
  • Role-based
  • Location-based
  • Explain the purpose of practices used to secure a corporate environment
  • Penetration testing: 
  • Rules of engagement
  • Reverse engineering: 
  • Isolation/sandboxing 
  • Hardware 
  • Software/malware
  • Training and exercises: 
  • Red team 
  • Blue team 
  • White team
  • Risk evaluation: 
  • Technical control review 
  • Operational control review 
  • Technical impact and likelihood
  • 2. Vulnerability Management
  • Given a scenario, implement an information security vulnerability management process
  • Identification of requirements: 
  • Regulatory environments 
  • Corporate policy 
  • Data classification 
  • Asset inventory
  • Establish scanning frequency: 
  • Risk appetite 
  • Regulatory requirements 
  • Technical constraints 
  • Workflow
  • Configure tools to perform scans according to specification: 
  • Determine scanning criteria 
  • Tool updates/plug-ins 
  • Permissions and access
  • Execute scanning
  • Generate reports: 
  • Automated vs. manual distribution
  • Remediation:
  • Prioritizing
  • Communication/change control
  • Sandboxing/testing
  • Inhibitors to remediation
  • Ongoing scanning and continuous monitoring
  • Given a scenario, analyze the output resulting from a vulnerability scan
  • Analyze reports from a vulnerability scan: 
  • Review and interpret scan results
  • Validate results and correlate other data points 
  • Compare to best practices or compliance 
  • Reconcile results 
  • Review related logs and/or other data sources 
  • Determine trends
  • Compare and contrast common vulnerabilities found in the following targets within an organization
  • Servers
  • Endpoints
  • Network infrastructure
  • Network appliances
  • Virtual infrastructure:
  • Virtual hosts
  • Virtual networks
  • Management interface
  • Mobile devices
  • Interconnected networks
  • Virtual private networks (VPNs)
  • Industrial Control Systems (ICSs)
  • SCADA devices
  • 3. Cyber Incident Response
  • Given a scenario, distinguish threat data or behavior to determine the impact of an incident
  • Threat classification: 
  • Known threats vs. unknown threats 
  • Zero day 
  • Advanced persistent threat
  • Factors contributing to incident severity and prioritization: 
  • Scope of impact
  • Types of data
  • Given a scenario, prepare a toolkit and use appropriate forensics tools during an investigation
  • Forensics kit: 
  • Digital forensics workstation 
  • Write blockers 
  • Cables 
  • Drive adapters 
  • Wiped removable media 
  • Cameras 
  • Crime tape 
  • Tamper-proof seals 
  • Documentation/forms
  • Forensic investigation suite:
  • Imaging utilities 
  • Analysis utilities 
  • Chain of custody 
  • Hashing utilities 
  • OS and process analysis 
  • Mobile device forensics 
  • Password crackers 
  • Cryptography tools 
  • Log viewers
  • Explain the importance of communication during the incident response process
  • Stakeholders:
  • HR
  • Legal
  • Marketing
  • Management
  • Purpose of communication processes:
  • Limit communication to trusted parties
  • Disclosure based on regulatory/legislative requirements
  • Prevent inadvertent release of information
  • Secure method of communication
  • Role-based responsibilities:
  • Technical 
  • Management 
  • Law enforcement 
  • Retain incident response provider
  • Given a scenario, analyze common symptoms to select the best course of action to support incident response
  • Common network-related symptoms:
  • Bandwidth consumption
  • Beaconing
  • Irregular peer-to-peer communication
  • Rogue devices on the network
  • Scan sweeps
  • Unusual traffic spikes
  • Common host-related symptoms:
  • Processor consumption
  • Memory consumption
  • Drive capacity consumption
  • Unauthorized software
  • Malicious processes
  • Unauthorized changes
  • Unauthorized privileges
  • Data exfiltration
  • Common application-related symptoms:
  • Anomalous activity 
  • Introduction of new accounts 
  • Unexpected output 
  • Unexpected outbound communication 
  • Service interruption 
  • Memory overflows
  • Summarize the incident recovery and post-incident response process
  • Containment techniques:
  • Segmentation
  • Isolation
  • Removal
  • Reverse engineering
  • Eradication techniques:
  • Sanitization 
  • Reconstruction/reimage 
  • Secure disposal
  • Validation:
  • Patching
  • Permissions
  • Scanning
  • Verify logging/communication to security monitoring
  • Corrective actions:
  • Lessons learned report
  • Change control process
  • Update incident response plan
  • Incident summary report
  • 4. Security Architecture and Tool Sets
  • Explain the relationship between frameworks, common policies, controls, and procedures
  • Regulatory compliance
  • Frameworks:
  • NIST
  • ISO
  • COBIT
  • SABSA
  • TOGAF
  • ITIL
  • Policies:
  • Password policy
  • Acceptable use policy
  • Data ownership policy
  • Data retention policy
  • Account management policy
  • Data classification policy
  • Controls:
  • Control selection based on criteria
  • Organizationally defined parameters
  • Physical controls
  • Logical controls
  • Administrative controls
  • Procedures: 
  • Continuous monitoring 
  • Evidence production 
  • Patching 
  • Compensating control development 
  • Control testing procedures 
  • Manage exceptions 
  • Remediation plans
  • Verifications and quality control: 
  • Audits 
  • Evaluations
  • Assessments
  • Maturity model
  • Certification
  • Given a scenario, use data to recommend remediation of security issues related to identity and access management
  • Security issues associated with context-based authentication:
  • Time
  • Location
  • Frequency
  • Behavioral
  • Security issues associated with identities:
  • Personnel
  • Endpoints
  • Servers
  • Services
  • Roles
  • Applications
  • Security issues associated with identity repositories:
  • Directory services
  • TACACS+
  • RADIUS
  • Security issues associated with federation and single sign-on:
  • Manual vs. automatic provisioning/deprovisioning
  • Self-service password reset
  • Exploits:
  • Impersonation
  • Man-in-the-middle
  • Session hijack
  • Cross-site scripting
  • Privilege escalation
  • Rootkit
  • Given ascenario, review security architecture and make recommendations to implement compensating controls
  • Security data analytics:
  • Data aggregation and correlation
  • Trend analysis
  • Historical analysis
  • Manual review: 
  • Firewall log 
  • Syslogs 
  • Authentication logs 
  • Event logs
  • Defense in depth:
  • Personnel
  • Processes
  • Technologies
  • Other security concepts
  • Given a scenario, use application security best practices while participating in the Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC)
  • Best practices during software development:
  • Security requirements definition
  • Security testing phases
  • Manual peer reviews
  • User acceptance testing
  • Stress test application
  • Security regression testing
  • Input validation
  • Secure coding best practices:
  • OWASP
  • SANS
  • Center for Internet Security
  • Compare and contrast the general purpose and reasons for using various cybersecurity tools and technologies
  • Preventative:
  • IPS
  • HIPS
  • Firewall
  • Antivirus
  • Anti-malware
  • EMET
  • Web proxy
  • Web Application Firewall (WAF)
  • Collective:
  • SIEM
  • Network scanning
  • Vulnerability scanning
  • Packet capture
  • Command line/IP utilities
  • IDS/HIDS
  • Analytical:
  • Vulnerability scanning
  • Monitoring tools
  • Interception proxy
  • Exploit:
  • Interception proxy
  • Exploit framework
  • Fuzzers
  • Forensics:
  • Forensic suites
  • Hashing
  • Password cracking
  • Imaging

 

COURSE PREREQUISITES

While there is no required prerequisite, the CompTIA CySA+ certification is intended to follow CompTIA Security+ or equivalent experience. It is recommended for CompTIA CySA+ certification candidates to have the following:

  • 3-4 years of hands-on information security or related experience
  • Network+, Security+, or equivalent knowledge

 

Price Includes International Curriculum Courseware And Very Active Real-Time Labs.

2 Hours Daily 3 Times a Week

Total Duration 4 Months

₵4,500.00
CERTIFIED INFORMATION SECURITY MANAGER(CISM) ((CISM))

CERTIFIED INFORMATION SECURITY MANAGER(CISM)

Course Overview

In this course, students will establish processes to ensure that information security measures align with established business needs.

Who Should Attend

The intended audience for this course is information security and IT professionals, such as network administrators and engineers, IT managers, and IT auditors, and other individuals who want to learn more about information security, who are interested in learning in-depth information about information security management, who are looking for career advancement in IT security, or who are interested in earning the CISM certification.

Course Objectives

Establish and maintain a framework to provide assurance that information security strategies are aligned with business objectives and consistent with applicable laws and regulations. Identify and manage information security risks to achieve business objectives. Create a program to implement the information security strategy. Implement an information security program. Oversee and direct information security activities to execute the information security program. Plan, develop, and manage capabilities to detect, respond to, and recover from information security incidents.

Course Outline

1 - Information Security Governance

  • Develop an Information Security Strategy
  • Align Information Security Strategy with Corporate Governance
  • Identify Legal and Regulatory Requirements
  • Justify Investment in Information Security
  • Identify Drivers Affecting the Organization
  • Obtain Senior Management Commitment to Information Security
  • Define Roles and Responsibilities for Information Security
  • Establish Reporting and Communication Channels

2 - Information Risk Management

  • Implement an Information Risk Assessment Process
  • Determine Information Asset Classification and Ownership
  • Conduct Ongoing Threat and Vulnerability Evaluations
  • Conduct Periodic BIAs
  • Identify and Evaluate Risk Mitigation Strategies
  • Integrate Risk Management into Business Life Cycle Processes
  • Report Changes in Information Risk

3 - Information Security Program Development

  • Develop Plans to Implement an Information Security Strategy
  • Security Technologies and Controls
  • Specify Information Security Program Activities
  • Coordinate Information Security Programs with Business Assurance Functions
  • Identify Resources Needed for Information Security Program Implementation
  • Develop Information Security Architectures
  • Develop Information Security Policies
  • Develop Information Security Awareness, Training, and Education Programs
  • Develop Supporting Documentation for Information Security Policies

4 - Information Security Program Implementation

  • Integrate Information Security Requirements into Organizational Processes
  • Integrate Information Security Controls into Contracts
  • Create Information Security Program Evaluation Metrics

5 - Information Security Program Management

  • Manage Information Security Program Resources
  • Enforce Policy and Standards Compliance
  • Enforce Contractual Information Security Controls
  • Enforce Information Security During Systems Development
  • Maintain Information Security Within an Organization
  • Provide Information Security Advice and Guidance
  • Provide Information Security Awareness and Training
  • Analyze the Effectiveness of Information Security Controls
  • Resolve Noncompliance Issues

6 - Incident Management and Response

  • Develop an Information Security Incident Response Plan
  • Establish an Escalation Process
  • Develop a Communication Process
  • Integrate an IRP
  • Develop IRTs
  • Test an IRP
  • Manage Responses to Information Security Incidents
  • Perform an Information Security Incident Investigation
  • Conduct Post-Incident Reviews

NB Class in consultation with management may be allowed to modify training time


Price Includes International Curriculum Courseware And Very Active Real-Time Labs.

4 Hours Daily 3 Times a Week

Total Duration 4 Months

₵2,500.00
Certified Ethical Hacker V7 (CEH) (Certified Ethical Hacker V7 (CEH))

Certified Ethical Hacker V7 (CEH)

The course on Certified Ethical Hacker V7 (CEH) is planned to offer essential skills required to examine the external and internal security threats against a network. This course will help you in constructing security policies that will defend important information of organizations. Participants will learn how to estimate Internet and network security issues, and how to employ successful firewall strategies and security policies. Participants will also learn how to depict network and system vulnerabilities and shield against them.

The participants will be able to

  • Analyze the internal and external security threats against a network.
  • Develop security policies that will protect an organization’s information.
  • Evaluate network and Internet security issues and design.
  • Implement successful security policies and firewall strategies.
  • Expose system and network vulnerabilities and defend against them.

Course Description:

This class will immerse the students into an interactive environment where they will be shown how to scan, test, hack and secure their own systems. The lab intensive environment gives each student in-depth knowledge and practical experience with the current essential security systems. Students will begin by understanding how perimeter defenses work and then be lead into scanning and attacking their own networks, no real network is harmed. Students then learn how intruders escalate privileges and what steps can be taken to secure a system. Students will also learn about Intrusion Detection, Policy Creation, Social Engineering, DDoS Attacks, Buffer Overflows and Virus Creation.

When a student leaves this intensive 4 months class they will have hands on understanding and experience in Ethical Hacking.

This course prepares you for EC-Council Certified Ethical Hacker exam 312-50.

Who Should Attend

This course will significantly benefit security officers, auditors, Network Security Administrator, security professionals, site administrators, and anyone who is concerned about the integrity of the network infrastructure.

Legal Agreement

Ethical Hacking and Countermeasures course mission is to educate, introduce and demonstrate hacking tools for penetration testing purposes only. Prior to attending this course, you will be asked to sign an agreement stating that you will not use the newly acquired skills for illegal or malicious attacks and you will not use such tools in an attempt to compromise any computer system, and to indemnify SkyWatch Technology Institute or EC-Council with respect to the use or misuse of these tools, regardless of intent.

 

Module 01: Introduction to Ethical Hacking

  • Internet Crime Current Report: IC3
  • Data Breach Investigations Report
  • Types of Data Stolen From the Organizations
  • Essential Terminologies
  • Elements of Information Security
  • Authenticity and Non-Repudiation
  • The Security, Functionality, and Usability Triangle
  • Security Challenges
  • Effects of Hacking
  • Effects of Hacking on Business
  • Who is a Hacker?
  • Hacker Classes
  • Hacktivism
  • What Does a Hacker Do?
  • Phase 1 - Reconnaissance
  • Reconnaissance Types
  • Phase 2 - Scanning
  • Phase 3 – Gaining Access
  • Phase 4 – Maintaining Access
  • Phase 5 – Covering Tracks
  • Types of Attacks on a System
  • Operating System Attacks
  • Application-Level Attacks
  • Shrink Wrap Code Attacks
  • Misconfiguration Attacks
  • Why Ethical Hacking is Necessary?
  • Defense in Depth
  • Scope and Limitations of Ethical Hacking
  • What Do Ethical Hackers Do?
  • Skills of an Ethical Hacker
  • Vulnerability Research
  • Vulnerability Research Websites
  • What is Penetration Testing?
  • Why Penetration Testing?
  • Penetration Testing Methodology

 

Module 02: Footprinting and Reconnaissance

  • Footprinting Terminologies
  • What is Footprinting?
  • Objectives of Footprinting
  • Footprinting Threats
  • Finding a Company’s URL
  • Locate Internal URLs
  • Public and Restricted Websites
  • Search for Company’s Information
  • Tools to Extract Company’s Data
  • Footprinting Through Search Engines
  • Collect Location Information
  • Satellite Picture of a Residence
  • People Search
  • People Search Using http://pipl.com
  • People Search Online Services
  • People Search on Social Networking Services
  • Gather Information from Financial Services
  • Footprinting Through Job Sites
  • Monitoring Target Using Alerts
  • Competitive Intelligence Gathering
  • Competitive Intelligence-When Did this Company Begin? How Did it Develop?
  • Competitive Intelligence-What are the Company's Plans?
  • Competitive Intelligence-What Expert Opinion Say About the Company?
  • Competitive Intelligence Tools
  • Competitive Intelligence Consulting Companies
  • WHOIS Lookup
  • WHOIS Lookup Result Analysis
  • WHOIS Lookup Tools: SmartWhois
  • WHOIS Lookup Tools
  • WHOIS Lookup Online Tools
  • Extracting DNS Information
  • DNS Interrogation Tools
  • DNS Interrogation Online Tools
  • Locate the Network Range
  • Traceroute
  • Traceroute Analysis
  • Traceroute Tool: 3D Traceroute
  • Traceroute Tool: LoriotPro
  • Traceroute Tool: Path Analyzer Pro
  • Traceroute Tools
  • Mirroring Entire Website
  • Website Mirroring Tools
  • Mirroring Entire Website Tools
  • Extract Website Information from http://www.archive.org
  • Monitoring Web Updates Using Website Watcher
  • Tracking Email Communications
  • Email Tracking Tools
  • Footprint Using Google Hacking Techniques
  • What a Hacker Can Do With Google Hacking?
  • Google Advance Search Operators
  • Finding Resources using Google Advance Operator
  • Google Hacking Tool: Google Hacking Database (GHDB)
  • Google Hacking Tools
  • Additional Footprinting Tools
  • Footprinting Countermeasures
  • Footprinting Pen Testing

 

Module 03: Scanning Networks

  • Network Scanning
  • Types of Scanning
  • Checking for Live Systems - ICMP Scanning
  • Ping Sweep
  • Ping Sweep Tools
  • Three-Way Handshake
  • TCP Communication Flags
  • Create Custom Packet using TCP Flags
  • Hping2 / Hping3
  • Hping Commands
  • Scanning Techniques
  • TCP Connect / Full Open Scan
  • Stealth Scan (Half-open Scan)
  • Xmas Scan
  • FIN Scan
  • NULL Scan
  • IDLE Scan
  • IDLE Scan: Step 1
  • IDLE Scan: Step 2.1 (Open Port)
  • IDLE Scan: Step 2.2 (Closed Port)
  • IDLE Scan: Step 3
  • ICMP Echo Scanning/List Scan
  • SYN/FIN Scanning Using IP Fragments
  • UDP Scanning
  • Inverse TCP Flag Scanning
  • ACK Flag Scanning
  • Scanning: IDS Evasion Techniques
  • IP Fragmentation Tools
  • Scanning Tool: Nmap
  • Scanning Tool: NetScan Tools Pro
  • Scanning Tools
  • Do Not Scan These IP Addresses (Unless you want to get into trouble)
  • Scanning Countermeasures
  • War Dialing
  • Why War Dialing?
  • War Dialing Tools
  • War Dialing Countermeasures
  • War Dialing Countermeasures: SandTrap Tool
  • OS Fingerprinting
  • Active Banner Grabbing Using Telnet
  • Banner Grabbing Tool: ID Serve
  • GET REQUESTS
  • Banner Grabbing Tool: Netcraft
  • Banner Grabbing Tools
  • Banner Grabbing Countermeasures: Disabling or Changing Banner
  • Hiding File Extensions
  • Hiding File Extensions from Webpages
  • Vulnerability Scanning
  • Vulnerability Scanning Tool: Nessus
  • Vulnerability Scanning Tool: SAINT
  • Vulnerability Scanning Tool: GFI LANGuard
  • Network Vulnerability Scanners
  • LANsurveyor
  • Network Mappers
  • Proxy Servers
  • Why Attackers Use Proxy Servers?
  • Use of Proxies for Attack
  • How Does MultiProxy Work?
  • Free Proxy Servers
  • Proxy Workbench
  • Proxifier Tool: Create Chain of Proxy Servers
  • SocksChain
  • TOR (The Onion Routing)
  • TOR Proxy Chaining Software
  • HTTP Tunneling Techniques
  • Why do I Need HTTP Tunneling?
  • Super Network Tunnel Tool
  • Httptunnel for Windows
  • Additional HTTP Tunneling Tools
  • SSH Tunneling
  • SSL Proxy Tool
  • How to Run SSL Proxy?
  • Proxy Tools
  • Anonymizers
  • Types of Anonymizers
  • Case: Bloggers Write Text Backwards to Bypass Web Filters in China
  • Text Conversion to Avoid Filters
  • Censorship Circumvention Tool: Psiphon
  • How Psiphon Works?
  • How to Check if Your Website is Blocked in China or Not?
  • G-Zapper
  • Anonymizer Tools
  • Spoofing IP Address
  • IP Spoofing Detection Techniques: Direct TTL Probes
  • IP Spoofing Detection Techniques: IP Identification Number
  • IP Spoofing Detection Techniques: TCP Flow Control Method
  • IP Spoofing Countermeasures
  • Scanning Pen Testing

 

Module 04: Enumeration

  • What is Enumeration?
  • Techniques for Enumeration
  • Netbios Enumeration
  • NetBIOS Enumeration Tool: SuperScan
  • NetBIOS Enumeration Tool: NetBIOS Enumerator
  • Enumerating User Accounts
  • Enumerate Systems Using Default Passwords
  • SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol) Enumeration
  • Management Information Base (MIB)
  • SNMP Enumeration Tool: OpUtils Network Monitoring Toolset
  • SNMP Enumeration Tool: SolarWinds
  • SNMP Enumeration Tools
  • UNIX/Linux Enumeration
  • Linux Enumeration Tool: Enum4linux
  • LDAP Enumeration
  • LDAP Enumeration Tool: JXplorer
  • LDAP Enumeration Tool
  • NTP Enumeration
  • NTP Server Discovery Tool: NTP Server Scanner
  • NTP Server: PresenTense Time Server
  • NTP Enumeration Tools
  • SMTP Enumeration
  • SMTP Enumeration Tool: NetScanTools Pro
  • DNS Zone Transfer Enumeration Using nslookup
  • DNS Analyzing and Enumeration Tool: The Men & Mice Suite
  • Enumeration Countermeasures
  • SMB Enumeration Countermeasures
  • Enumeration Pen Testing

 

Module 05: System Hacking

  • Information at Hand Before System Hacking Stage
  • System Hacking: Goals
  • CEH Hacking Methodology (CHM)
  • Password Cracking
  • Password Complexity
  • Password Cracking Techniques
  • Types of Password Attacks
  • Passive Online Attacks: Wire Sniffing
  • Password Sniffing
  • Passive Online Attack: Man-in-the-Middle and Replay Attack
  • Active Online Attack: Password Guessing
  • Active Online Attack: Trojan/Spyware/Keylogger
  • Active Online Attack: Hash Injection Attack
  • Rainbow Attacks: Pre-Computed Hash
  • Distributed Network Attack
  • Elcomsoft Distributed Password Recovery
  • Non-Electronic Attacks
  • Default Passwords
  • Manual Password Cracking (Guessing)
  • Automatic Password Cracking Algorithm
  • Stealing Passwords Using USB Drive
  • Microsoft Authentication
  • How Hash Passwords are Stored in Windows SAM?
  • What is LAN Manager Hash?
  • LM “Hash” Generation
  • LM, NTLMv1, and NTLMv2
  • NTLM Authentication Process
  • Kerberos Authentication
  • Salting
  • PWdump7 and Fgdump
  • L0phtCrack
  • Ophcrack
  • Cain & Abel
  • RainbowCrack
  • Password Cracking Tools
  • LM Hash Backward Compatibility
  • How to Disable LM HASH?
  • How to Defend against Password Cracking?
  • Implement and Enforce Strong Security Policy
  • Privilege Escalation
  • Escalation of Privileges
  • Active@ Password Changer
  • Privilege Escalation Tools
  • How to Defend against Privilege Escalation?
  • Executing Applications
  • Alchemy Remote Executor
  • RemoteExec
  • Execute This!
  • Keylogger
  • Types of Keystroke Loggers
  • Acoustic/CAM Keylogger
  • Keylogger: Advanced Keylogger
  • Keylogger: Spytech SpyAgent
  • Keylogger: Perfect Keylogger
  • Keylogger: Powered Keylogger
  • Keylogger for Mac: Aobo Mac OS X KeyLogger
  • Keylogger for Mac: Perfect Keylogger for Mac
  • Hardware Keylogger: KeyGhost
  • Keyloggers
  • Spyware
  • What Does the Spyware Do?
  • Types of Spywares
  • Desktop Spyware
  • Desktop Spyware: Activity Monitor
  • Email and Internet Spyware
  • Email and Internet Spyware: eBLASTER
  • Internet and E-mail Spyware
  • Child Monitoring Spyware
  • Child Monitoring Spyware: Advanced Parental Control
  • Screen Capturing Spyware
  • Screen Capturing Spyware: Spector Pro
  • USB Spyware
  • USB Spyware: USBDumper
  • Audio Spyware
  • Audio Spyware: RoboNanny, Stealth Recorder Pro and Spy Voice Recorder
  • Video Spyware
  • Video Spyware: Net Video Spy
  • Print Spyware
  • Print Spyware: Printer Activity Monitor
  • Telephone/Cellphone Spyware
  • Cellphone Spyware: Mobile Spy
  • GPS Spyware
  • GPS Spyware: GPS TrackMaker
  • How to Defend against Keyloggers?
  • Anti-Keylogger
  • Anti-Keylogger: Zemana AntiLogger
  • Anti-Keyloggers
  • How to Defend against Spyware?
  • Anti-Spyware: Spyware Doctor
  • Rootkits
  • Types of Rootkits
  • How Rootkit Works?
  • Rootkit: Fu
  • Detecting Rootkits
  • Steps for Detecting Rootkits
  • How to Defend against Rootkits?
  • Anti-Rootkit: RootkitRevealer and McAfee Rootkit Detective
  • NTFS Data Stream
  • How to Create NTFS Streams?
  • NTFS Stream Manipulation
  • How to Defend against NTFS Streams?
  • NTFS Stream Detector: ADS Scan Engine
  • NTFS Stream Detectors
  • What is Steganography?
  • Steganography Techniques
  • How Steganography Works?
  • Types of Steganography
  • Whitespace Steganography Tool: SNOW
  • Image Steganography
  • Image Steganography: Hermetic Stego
  • Image Steganography Tools
  • Document Steganography: wbStego
  • Document Steganography Tools
  • Video Steganography: Our Secret
  • Video Steganography Tools
  • Audio Steganography: Mp3stegz
  • Audio Steganography Tools
  • Folder Steganography: Invisible Secrets 4
  • Folder Steganography Tools
  • Spam/Email Steganography: Spam Mimic
  • Natural Text Steganography: Sams Big G Play Maker
  • Steganalysis
  • Steganalysis Methods/Attacks on Steganography
  • Steganography Detection Tool: Stegdetect
  • Steganography Detection Tools
  • Why Cover Tracks?
  • Covering Tracks
  • Ways to Clear Online Tracks
  • Disabling Auditing: Auditpol
  • Covering Tracks Tool: Window Washer
  • Covering Tracks Tool: Tracks Eraser Pro
  • Track Covering Tools
  • System Hacking Penetration Testing

 

Module 06: Trojans and Backdoors

  • What is a Trojan?
  • Overt and Covert Channels
  • Purpose of Trojans
  • What Do Trojan Creators Look For?
  • Indications of a Trojan Attack
  • Common Ports used by Trojans
  • How to Infect Systems Using a Trojan?
  • Wrappers
  • Wrapper Covert Programs
  • Different Ways a Trojan can Get into a System
  • How to Deploy a Trojan?
  • Evading Anti-Virus Techniques
  • Types of Trojans
  • Command Shell Trojans
  • Command Shell Trojan: Netcat
  • GUI Trojan: MoSucker
  • GUI Trojan: Jumper and Biodox
  • Document Trojans
  • E-mail Trojans
  • E-mail Trojans: RemoteByMail
  • Defacement Trojans
  • Defacement Trojans: Restorator
  • Botnet Trojans
  • Botnet Trojan: Illusion Bot
  • Botnet Trojan: NetBot Attacker
  • Proxy Server Trojans
  • Proxy Server Trojan: W3bPrOxy Tr0j4nCr34t0r (Funny Name)
  • FTP Trojans
  • FTP Trojan: TinyFTPD
  • VNC Trojans
  • HTTP/HTTPS Trojans
  • HTTP Trojan: HTTP RAT
  • Shttpd Trojan - HTTPS (SSL)
  • ICMP Tunneling
  • ICMP Trojan: icmpsend
  • Remote Access Trojans
  • Remote Access Trojan: RAT DarkComet
  • Remote Access Trojan: Apocalypse
  • Covert Channel Trojan: CCTT
  • E-banking Trojans
  • Banking Trojan Analysis
  • E-banking Trojan: ZeuS
  • Destructive Trojans
  • Notification Trojans
  • Credit Card Trojans
  • Data Hiding Trojans (Encrypted Trojans)
  • BlackBerry Trojan: PhoneSnoop
  • MAC OS X Trojan: DNSChanger
  • MAC OS X Trojan: DNSChanger
  • Mac OS X Trojan: Hell Raiser
  • How to Detect Trojans?
  • Scanning for Suspicious Ports
  • Port Monitoring Tool: IceSword
  • Port Monitoring Tools: CurrPorts and TCPView
  • Scanning for Suspicious Processes
  • Process Monitoring Tool: What's Running
  • Process Monitoring Tools
  • Scanning for Suspicious Registry Entries
  • Registry Entry Monitoring Tools
  • Scanning for Suspicious Device Drivers
  • Device Drivers Monitoring Tools: DriverView
  • Device Drivers Monitoring Tools
  • Scanning for Suspicious Windows Services
  • Windows Services Monitoring Tools: Windows Service Manager (SrvMan)
  • Windows Services Monitoring Tools
  • Scanning for Suspicious Startup Programs
  • Windows7 Startup Registry Entries
  • Startup Programs Monitoring Tools: Starter
  • Startup Programs Monitoring Tools: Security AutoRun
  • Startup Programs Monitoring Tools
  • Scanning for Suspicious Files and Folders
  • Files and Folder Integrity Checker: FastSum and WinMD5
  • Files and Folder Integrity Checker
  • Scanning for Suspicious Network Activities
  • Detecting Trojans and Worms with Capsa Network Analyzer
  • Trojan Countermeasures
  • Backdoor Countermeasures
  • Trojan Horse Construction Kit
  • Anti-Trojan Software: TrojanHunter
  • Anti-Trojan Software: Emsisoft Anti-Malware
  • Anti-Trojan Softwares
  • Pen Testing for Trojans and Backdoors

 

Module 07: Viruses and Worms

  • Introduction to Viruses
  • Virus and Worm Statistics 2010
  • Stages of Virus Life
  • Working of Viruses: Infection Phase
  • Working of Viruses: Attack Phase
  • Why Do People Create Computer Viruses?
  • Indications of Virus Attack
  • How does a Computer get Infected by Viruses?
  • Virus Hoaxes
  • Virus Analysis:
  • W32/Sality AA
  • W32/Toal-A
  • W32/Virut
  • Klez
  • Types of Viruses
  • System or Boot Sector Viruses
  • File and Multipartite Viruses
  • Macro Viruses
  • Cluster Viruses
  • Stealth/Tunneling Viruses
  • Encryption Viruses
  • Polymorphic Code
  • Metamorphic Viruses
  • File Overwriting or Cavity Viruses
  • Sparse Infector Viruses
  • Companion/Camouflage Viruses
  • Shell Viruses
  • File Extension Viruses
  • Add-on and Intrusive Viruses
  • Transient and Terminate and Stay Resident Viruses
  • Writing a Simple Virus Program
  • Terabit Virus Maker
  • JPS Virus Maker
  • DELmE's Batch Virus Maker
  • Computer Worms
  • How is a Worm Different from a Virus?
  • Example of Worm Infection: Conficker Worm
  • What does the Conficker Worm do?
  • How does the Conficker Worm Work?
  • Worm Analysis:
  • W32/Netsky
  • W32/Bagle.GE
  • Worm Maker: Internet Worm Maker Thing
  • What is Sheep Dip Computer?
  • Anti-Virus Sensors Systems
  • Malware Analysis Procedure
  • String Extracting Tool: Bintext
  • Compression and Decompression Tool: UPX
  • Process Monitoring Tools: Process Monitor
  • Log Packet Content Monitoring Tools: NetResident
  • Debugging Tool: Ollydbg
  • Virus Analysis Tool: IDA Pro
  • Online Malware Testing:
  • Sunbelt CWSandbox
  • VirusTotal
  • Online Malware Analysis Services
  • Virus Detection Methods
  • Virus and Worms Countermeasures
  • Companion Antivirus: Immunet Protect
  • Anti-virus Tools
  • Penetration Testing for Virus

 

Module 08: Sniffers

  • Lawful Intercept
  • Benefits of Lawful Intercept
  • Network Components Used for Lawful Intercept
  • Wiretapping
  • Sniffing Threats
  • How a Sniffer Works?
  • Hacker Attacking a Switch
  • Types of Sniffing: Passive Sniffing
  • Types of Sniffing: Active Sniffing
  • Protocols Vulnerable to Sniffing
  • Tie to Data Link Layer in OSI Model
  • Hardware Protocol Analyzers
  • SPAN Port
  • MAC Flooding
  • MAC Address/CAM Table
  • How CAM Works?
  • What Happens When CAM Table is Full?
  • Mac Flooding Switches with macof
  • MAC Flooding Tool: Yersinia
  • How to Defend against MAC Attacks?
  • How DHCP Works?
  • DHCP Request/Reply Messages
  • IPv4 DHCP Packet Format
  • DHCP Starvation Attack
  • Rogue DHCP Server Attack
  • DHCP Starvation Attack Tool: Gobbler
  • How to Defend Against DHCP Starvation and Rogue Server Attack?
  • What is Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)?
  • ARP Spoofing Attack
  • How Does ARP Spoofing Work?
  • Threats of ARP Poisoning
  • ARP Poisoning Tool: Cain and Abel
  • ARP Poisoning Tool: WinArpAttacker
  • ARP Poisoning Tool: Ufasoft Snif
  • How to Defend Against ARP Poisoning? Use DHCP Snooping Binding Table and Dynamic ARP Inspection
  • Configuring DHCP Snooping and Dynamic ARP Inspection on Cisco Switches
  • MAC Spoofing/Duplicating
  • Spoofing Attack Threats
  • MAC Spoofing Tool: SMAC
  • How to Defend Against MAC Spoofing? Use DHCP Snooping Binding Table, Dynamic ARP Inspection and IP Source Guard
  • DNS Poisoning Techniques
  • Intranet DNS Spoofing
  • Internet DNS Spoofing
  • Proxy Server DNS Poisoning
  • DNS Cache Poisoning
  • How to Defend Against DNS Spoofing?
  • Sniffing Tool: Wireshark
  • Follow TCP Stream in Wireshark
  • Display Filters in Wireshark
  • Additional Wireshark Filters
  • Sniffing Tool: CACE Pilot
  • Sniffing Tool: Tcpdump/Windump
  • Discovery Tool: NetworkView
  • Discovery Tool: The Dude Sniffer
  • Password Sniffing Tool: Ace
  • Packet Sniffing Tool: Capsa Network Analyzer
  • OmniPeek Network Analyzer
  • Network Packet Analyzer: Observer
  • Session Capture Sniffer: NetWitness
  • Email Message Sniffer: Big-Mother
  • TCP/IP Packet Crafter: Packet Builder
  • Additional Sniffing Tools
  • How an Attacker Hacks the Network Using Sniffers?
  • How to Defend Against Sniffing?
  • Sniffing Prevention Techniques
  • How to Detect Sniffing?
  • Promiscuous Detection Tool: PromqryUI
  • Promiscuous Detection Tool: PromiScan

 

Module 09: Social Engineering

  • What is Social Engineering?
  • Behaviors Vulnerable to Attacks
  • Factors that Make Companies Vulnerable to Attacks
  • Why is Social Engineering Effective?
  • Warning Signs of an Attack
  • Phases in a Social Engineering Attack
  • Impact on the Organization
  • Command Injection Attacks
  • Common Targets of Social Engineering
  • Common Targets of Social Engineering: Office Workers
  • Types of Social Engineering
  • Human-Based Social Engineering
  • Technical Support Example
  • Authority Support Example
  • Human-based Social Engineering: Dumpster Diving
  • Computer-Based Social Engineering
  • Computer-Based Social Engineering: Pop-Ups
  • Computer-Based Social Engineering: Phishing
  • Social Engineering Using SMS
  • Social Engineering by a “Fake SMS Spying Tool”
  • Insider Attack
  • Disgruntled Employee
  • Preventing Insider Threats
  • Common Intrusion Tactics and Strategies for Prevention
  • Social Engineering Through Impersonation on Social Networking Sites
  • Social Engineering Example: LinkedIn Profile
  • Social Engineering on Facebook
  • Social Engineering on Twitter
  • Social Engineering on Orkut
  • Social Engineering on MySpace
  • Risks of Social Networking to Corporate Networks
  • Identity Theft Statistics 2010
  • Identify Theft
  • How to Steal an Identity?
  • STEP 1
  • STEP 2
  • STEP 3
  • Real Steven Gets Huge Credit Card Statement
  • Identity Theft - Serious Problem
  • Social Engineering Countermeasures: Policies
  • Social Engineering Countermeasures
  • How to Detect Phishing Emails?
  • Anti-Phishing Toolbar: Netcraft
  • Anti-Phishing Toolbar: PhishTank
  • Identity Theft Countermeasures
  • Social Engineering Pen Testing
  • Social Engineering Pen Testing: Using Emails
  • Social Engineering Pen Testing: Using Phone
  • Social Engineering Pen Testing: In Person

 

Module 10: Denial of Service

  • What is a Denial of Service Attack?
  • What is Distributed Denial of Service Attacks?
  • How Distributed Denial of Service Attacks Work?
  • Symptoms of a DoS Attack
  • Cyber Criminals
  • Organized Cyber Crime: Organizational Chart
  • Internet Chat Query (ICQ)
  • Internet Relay Chat (IRC)
  • DoS Attack Techniques
  • Bandwidth Attacks
  • Service Request Floods
  • SYN Attack
  • SYN Flooding
  • ICMP Flood Attack
  • Peer-to-Peer Attacks
  • Permanent Denial-of-Service Attack
  • Application Level Flood Attacks
  • Botnet
  • Botnet Propagation Technique
  • Botnet Ecosystem
  • Botnet Trojan: Shark
  • Poison Ivy: Botnet Command Control Center
  • Botnet Trojan: PlugBot
  • WikiLeak Operation Payback
  • DDoS Attack
  • DDoS Attack Tool: LOIC
  • Denial of Service Attack Against MasterCard, Visa, and Swiss Banks
  • Hackers Advertise Links to Download Botnet
  • DoS Attack Tools
  • Detection Techniques
  • Activity Profiling
  • Wavelet Analysis
  • Sequential Change-Point Detection
  • DoS/DDoS Countermeasure Strategies
  • DDoS Attack Countermeasures
  • DoS/DDoS Countermeasures: Protect Secondary Victims
  • DoS/DDoS Countermeasures: Detect and Neutralize Handlers
  • DoS/DDoS Countermeasures: Detect Potential Attacks
  • DoS/DDoS Countermeasures: Deflect Attacks
  • DoS/DDoS Countermeasures: Mitigate Attacks
  • Post-attack Forensics
  • Techniques to Defend against Botnets
  • DoS/DDoS Countermeasures
  • DoS/DDoS Protection at ISP Level
  • Enabling TCP Intercept on Cisco IOS Software
  • Advanced DDoS Protection: IntelliGuard DDoS Protection System (DPS)
  • DoS/DDoS Protection Tool
  • Denial of Service (DoS) Attack Penetration Testing

 

Module 11: Session Hijacking

  • What is Session Hijacking?
  • Dangers Posed by Hijacking
  • Why Session Hijacking is Successful?
  • Key Session Hijacking Techniques
  • Brute Forcing
  • Brute Forcing Attack
  • HTTP Referrer Attack
  • Spoofing vs. Hijacking
  • Session Hijacking Process
  • Packet Analysis of a Local Session Hijack
  • Types of Session Hijacking
  • Session Hijacking in OSI Model
  • Application Level Session Hijacking
  • Session Sniffing
  • Predictable Session Token
  • How to Predict a Session Token?
  • Man-in-the-Middle Attack
  • Man-in-the-Browser Attack
  • Steps to Perform Man-in-the-Browser Attack
  • Client-side Attacks
  • Cross-site Script Attack
  • Session Fixation
  • Session Fixation Attack
  • Network Level Session Hijacking
  • The 3-Way Handshake
  • Sequence Numbers
  • Sequence Number Prediction
  • TCP/IP Hijacking
  • IP Spoofing: Source Routed Packets
  • RST Hijacking
  • Blind Hijacking
  • Man-in-the-Middle Attack using Packet Sniffer
  • UDP Hijacking
  • Session Hijacking Tools
  • Paros
  • Burp Suite
  • Firesheep
  • Countermeasures
  • Protecting against Session Hijacking
  • Methods to Prevent Session Hijacking: To be Followed by Web Developers
  • Methods to Prevent Session Hijacking: To be Followed by Web Users
  • Defending against Session Hijack Attacks
  • Session Hijacking Remediation
  • IPSec
  • Modes of IPSec
  • IPSec Architecture
  • IPSec Authentication and Confidentiality
  • Components of IPSec
  • IPSec Implementation
  • Session Hijacking Pen Testing

 

Module 12: Hijacking Webservers

  • Webserver Market Shares
  • Open Source Webserver Architecture
  • IIS Webserver Architecture
  • Website Defacement
  • Case Study
  • Why Web Servers are Compromised?
  • Impact of Webserver Attacks
  • Webserver Misconfiguration
  • Example
  • Directory Traversal Attacks
  • HTTP Response Splitting Attack
  • Web Cache Poisoning Attack
  • HTTP Response Hijacking
  • SSH Bruteforce Attack
  • Man-in-the-Middle Attack
  • Webserver Password Cracking
  • Webserver Password Cracking Techniques
  • Web Application Attacks
  • Webserver Attack Methodology
  • Information Gathering
  • Webserver Footprinting
  • Webserver Footprinting Tools
  • Mirroring a Website
  • Vulnerability Scanning
  • Session Hijacking
  • Hacking Web Passwords
  • Webserver Attack Tools
  • Metasploit
  • Metasploit Architecture
  • Metasploit Exploit Module
  • Metasploit Payload Module
  • Metasploit Auxiliary Module
  • Metasploit NOPS Module
  • Wfetch
  • Web Password Cracking Tool
  • Brutus
  • THC-Hydra
  • Countermeasures
  • Patches and Updates
  • Protocols
  • Accounts
  • Files and Directories
  • How to Defend Against Web Server Attacks?
  • How to Defend against HTTP Response Splitting and Web Cache Poisoning?
  • Patches and Hotfixes
  • What is Patch Management?
  • Identifying Appropriate Sources for Updates and Patches
  • Installation of a Patch
  • Patch Management Tool: Microsoft Baseline Security Analyzer (MBSA)
  • Patch Management Tools
  • Web Application Security Scanner: Sandcat
  • Web Server Security Scanner: Wikto
  • Webserver Malware Infection Monitoring Tool: HackAlert
  • Webserver Security Tools
  • Web Server Penetration Testing

 

Module 13: Hacking Web Applications

  • Web Application Security Statistics
  • Introduction to Web Applications
  • Web Application Components
  • How Web Applications Work?
  • Web Application Architecture
  • Web 2.0 Applications
  • Vulnerability Stack
  • Web Attack Vectors
  • Web Application Threats - 1
  • Web Application Threats - 2

 

  • Unvalidated Input
  • Parameter/Form Tampering
  • Directory Traversal
  • Security Misconfiguration
  • Injection Flaws
  • SQL Injection Attacks
  • Command Injection Attacks
  • Command Injection Example
  • File Injection Attack
  • What is LDAP Injection?
  • How LDAP Injection Works?
  • Hidden Field Manipulation Attack
  • Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) Attacks
  • How XSS Attacks Work?
  • Cross-Site Scripting Attack Scenario: Attack via Email
  • XSS Example: Attack via Email
  • XSS Example: Stealing Users' Cookies
  • XSS Example: Sending an Unauthorized Request
  • XSS Attack in Blog Posting
  • XSS Attack in Comment Field
  • XSS Cheat Sheet
  • Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF) Attack
  • How CSRF Attacks Work?
  • Web Application Denial-of-Service (DoS) Attack
  • Denial of Service (DoS) Examples
  • Buffer Overflow Attacks
  • Cookie/Session Poisoning
  • How Cookie Poisoning Works?
  • Session Fixation Attack
  • Insufficient Transport Layer Protection
  • Improper Error Handling
  • Insecure Cryptographic Storage
  • Broken Authentication and Session Management
  • Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards
  • Web Services Architecture
  • Web Services Attack
  • Web Services Footprinting Attack
  • Web Services XML Poisoning
  • Footprint Web Infrastructure
  • Footprint Web Infrastructure: Server Discovery
  • Footprint Web Infrastructure: Server Identification/Banner Grabbing
  • Footprint Web Infrastructure: Hidden Content Discovery
  • Web Spidering Using Burp Suite
  • Hacking Web Servers
  • Web Server Hacking Tool: WebInspect
  • Analyze Web Applications
  • Analyze Web Applications: Identify Entry Points for User Input
  • Analyze Web Applications: Identify Server-Side Technologies
  • Analyze Web Applications: Identify Server-Side Functionality
  • Analyze Web Applications: Map the Attack Surface
  • Attack Authentication Mechanism
  • Username Enumeration
  • Password Attacks: Password Functionality Exploits
  • Password Attacks: Password Guessing
  • Password Attacks: Brute-forcing
  • Session Attacks: Session ID Prediction/ Brute-forcing
  • Cookie Exploitation: Cookie Poisoning
  • Authorization Attack
  • HTTP Request Tampering
  • Authorization Attack: Cookie Parameter Tampering
  • Session Management Attack
  • Attacking Session Token Generation Mechanism
  • Attacking Session Tokens Handling Mechanism: Session Token Sniffing
  • Injection Attacks
  • Attack Data Connectivity
  • Connection String Injection
  • Connection String Parameter Pollution (CSPP) Attacks
  • Connection Pool DoS
  • Attack Web App Client
  • Attack Web Services
  • Web Services Probing Attacks
  • Web Service Attacks: SOAP Injection
  • Web Service Attacks: XML Injection
  • Web Services Parsing Attacks
  • Web Service Attack Tool: soapUI
  • Web Service Attack Tool: XMLSpy
  • Web Application Hacking Tool: Burp Suite Professional
  • Web Application Hacking Tools: CookieDigger
  • Web Application Hacking Tools: WebScarab
  • Web Application Hacking Tools
  • Encoding Schemes
  • How to Defend Against SQL Injection Attacks?
  • How to Defend Against Command Injection Flaws?
  • How to Defend Against XSS Attacks?
  • How to Defend Against DoS Attack?
  • How to Defend Against Web Services Attack?
  • Web Application Countermeasures
  • How to Defend Against Web Application Attacks?
  • Web Application Security Tool: Acunetix Web Vulnerability Scanner
  • Web Application Security Tool: Falcove Web Vulnerability Scanner
  • Web Application Security Scanner: Netsparker
  • Web Application Security Tool: N-Stalker Web Application Security Scanner
  • Web Application Security Tools
  • Web Application Firewall: dotDefender
  • Web Application Firewall: IBM AppScan
  • Web Application Firewall: ServerDefender VP

 

  • Web Application Firewall
  • Web Application Pen Testing
  • Information Gathering
  • Configuration Management Testing
  • Authentication Testing
  • Session Management Testing
  • Authorization Testing
  • Data Validation Testing
  • Denial of Service Testing
  • Web Services Testing
  • AJAX Testing

 

Module 14: SQL Injection

  • SQL Injection is the Most Prevalent Vulnerability in 2010
  • SQL Injection Threats
  • What is SQL Injection?
  • SQL Injection Attacks
  • How Web Applications Work?
  • Server Side Technologies
  • HTTP Post Request
  • Example 1: Normal SQL Query
  • Example 1: SQL Injection Query
  • Example 1: Code Analysis
  • Example 2: BadProductList.aspx
  • Example 2: Attack Analysis
  • Example 3: Updating Table
  • Example 4: Adding New Records
  • Example 5: Identifying the Table Name
  • Example 6: Deleting a Table
  • SQL Injection Detection
  • SQL Injection Error Messages
  • SQL Injection Attack Characters
  • Additional Methods to Detect SQL Injection
  • SQL Injection Black Box Pen Testing
  • Testing for SQL Injection
  • Types of SQL Injection
  • Simple SQL Injection Attack
  • Union SQL Injection Example
  • SQL Injection Error Based
  • What is Blind SQL Injection?
  • No Error Messages Returned
  • Blind SQL Injection: WAITFOR DELAY YES or NO Response
  • Blind SQL Injection – Exploitation (MySQL)
  • Blind SQL Injection - Extract Database User
  • Blind SQL Injection - Extract Database Name
  • Blind SQL Injection - Extract Column Name
  • Blind SQL Injection - Extract Data from ROWS

 

  • SQL Injection Methodology
  • Information Gathering
  • Extracting Information through Error Messages
  • Understanding SQL Query
  • Bypass Website Logins Using SQL Injection
  • Database, Table, and Column Enumeration
  • Advanced Enumeration
  • Features of Different DBMSs
  • Creating Database Accounts
  • Password Grabbing
  • Grabbing SQL Server Hashes
  • Extracting SQL Hashes (In a Single Statement)
  • Transfer Database to Attacker’s Machine
  • Interacting with the Operating System
  • Interacting with the FileSystem
  • Network Reconnaissance Full Query
  • SQL Injection Tools
  • SQL Injection Tools: BSQLHacker
  • SQL Injection Tools: Marathon Tool
  • SQL Injection Tools: SQL Power Injector
  • SQL Injection Tools: Havij
  • Evading IDS
  • Types of Signature Evasion Techniques
  • Evasion Technique: Sophisticated Matches
  • Evasion Technique: Hex Encoding
  • Evasion Technique: Manipulating White Spaces
  • Evasion Technique: In-line Comment
  • Evasion Technique: Char Encoding
  • Evasion Technique: String Concatenation
  • Evasion Technique: Obfuscated Codes
  • How to Defend Against SQL Injection Attacks?
  • How to Defend Against SQL Injection Attacks: Use Type-Safe SQL

Parameters

  • SQL Injection Detection Tools
  • SQL Injection Detection Tool: Microsoft Source Code Analyzer
  • SQL Injection Detection Tool: Microsoft UrlScan
  • SQL Injection Detection Tool: dotDefender
  • SQL Injection Detection Tool: IBM AppScan
  • Snort Rule to Detect SQL Injection Attacks

 

Module 15: Hacking Wireless Networks

  • Wireless Networks
  • Wi-Fi Usage Statistics in the US
  • Wi-Fi Hotspots at Public Places
  • Wi-Fi Networks at Home
  • Types of Wireless Networks
  • Wireless Standards
  • Service Set Identifier (SSID)
  • Wi-Fi Authentication Modes
  • Wi-Fi Authentication Process Using a Centralized Authentication Server
  • Wi-Fi Authentication Process
  • Wireless Terminologies
  • Wi-Fi Chalking
  • Wi-Fi Chalking Symbols
  • Wi-Fi Hotspot Finder: jiwire.com
  • Wi-Fi Hotspot Finder: WeFi.com
  • Types of Wireless Antenna
  • Parabolic Grid Antenna
  • Types of Wireless Encryption
  • WEP Encryption
  • How WEP Works?
  • What is WPA?
  • How WPA Works?
  • Temporal Keys
  • What is WPA2?
  • How WPA2 Works?
  • WEP vs. WPA vs. WPA2
  • WEP Issues
  • Weak Initialization Vectors (IV)
  • How to Break WEP Encryption?
  • How to Break WPA/WPA2 Encryption?
  • How to Defend Against WPA Cracking?
  • Wireless Threats: Access Control Attacks
  • Wireless Threats: Integrity Attacks
  • Wireless Threats: Confidentiality Attacks
  • Wireless Threats: Availability Attacks
  • Wireless Threats: Authentication Attacks
  • Rogue Access Point Attack
  • Client Mis-association
  • Misconfigured Access Point Attack
  • Unauthorized Association
  • Ad Hoc Connection Attack
  • HoneySpot Access Point Attack
  • AP MAC Spoofing
  • Denial-of-Service Attack
  • Jamming Signal Attack
  • Wi-Fi Jamming Devices
  • Wireless Hacking Methodology
  • Find Wi-Fi Networks to Attack
  • Attackers Scanning for Wi-Fi Networks
  • Footprint the Wireless Network
  • Wi-Fi Discovery Tool: inSSIDer
  • Wi-Fi Discovery Tool: NetSurveyor
  • Wi-Fi Discovery Tool: NetStumbler
  • Wi-Fi Discovery Tool: Vistumbler

 

  • Wi-Fi Discovery Tool: WirelessMon
  • Wi-Fi Discovery Tools
  • GPS Mapping
  • GPS Mapping Tool: WIGLE
  • GPS Mapping Tool: Skyhook
  • How to Discover Wi-Fi Network Using Wardriving?
  • Wireless Traffic Analysis
  • Wireless Cards and Chipsets
  • Wi-Fi USB Dongle: AirPcap
  • Wi-Fi Packet Sniffer: Wireshark with AirPcap
  • Wi-Fi Packet Sniffer: Wi-Fi Pilot
  • Wi-Fi Packet Sniffer: OmniPeek
  • Wi-Fi Packet Sniffer: CommView for Wi-Fi
  • What is Spectrum Analysis?
  • Wireless Sniffers
  • Aircrack-ng Suite
  • How to Reveal Hidden SSIDs
  • Fragmentation Attack
  • How to Launch MAC Spoofing Attack?
  • Denial of Service: Deauthentication and Disassociation Attacks
  • Man-in-the-Middle Attack
  • MITM Attack Using Aircrack-ng
  • Wireless ARP Poisoning Attack
  • Rogue Access Point
  • Evil Twin
  • How to Set Up a Fake Hotspot (Evil Twin)?
  • How to Crack WEP Using Aircrack?
  • How to Crack WEP Using Aircrack? Screenshot 1/2
  • How to Crack WEP Using Aircrack? Screenshot 2/2
  • How to Crack WPA-PSK Using Aircrack?
  • WPA Cracking Tool: KisMAC
  • WEP Cracking Using Cain & Abel
  • WPA Brute Forcing Using Cain & Abel
  • WPA Cracking Tool: Elcomsoft Wireless Security Auditor
  • WEP/WPA Cracking Tools
  • Wi-Fi Sniffer: Kismet
  • Wardriving Tools
  • RF Monitoring Tools
  • Wi-Fi Connection Manager Tools
  • Wi-Fi Traffic Analyzer Tools
  • Wi-Fi Raw Packet Capturing Tools
  • Wi-Fi Spectrum Analyzing Tools
  • Bluetooth Hacking
  • Bluetooth Stack
  • Bluetooth Threats
  • How to BlueJack a Victim?
  • Bluetooth Hacking Tool: Super Bluetooth Hack
  • Bluetooth Hacking Tool: PhoneSnoop

 

  • Bluetooth Hacking Tool: BlueScanner
  • Bluetooth Hacking Tools
  • How to Defend Against Bluetooth Hacking?
  • How to Detect and Block Rogue AP?
  • Wireless Security Layers
  • How to Defend Against Wireless Attacks?
  • Wireless Intrusion Prevention Systems
  • Wireless IPS Deployment
  • Wi-Fi Security Auditing Tool: AirMagnet WiFi Analyzer
  • Wi-Fi Security Auditing Tool: AirDefense
  • Wi-Fi Security Auditing Tool: Adaptive Wireless IPS
  • Wi-Fi Security Auditing Tool: Aruba RFProtect WIPS
  • Wi-Fi Intrusion Prevention System
  • Wi-Fi Predictive Planning Tools
  • Wi-Fi Vulnerability Scanning Tools
  • Wireless Penetration Testing
  • Wireless Penetration Testing Framework
  • Wi-Fi Pen Testing Framework
  • Pen Testing LEAP Encrypted WLAN
  • Pen Testing WPA/WPA2 Encrypted WLAN
  • Pen Testing WEP Encrypted WLAN
  • Pen Testing Unencrypted WLAN

 

Module 16: Evading IDS, Firewalls, and Honeypots

  • Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS) and its Placement
  • How IDS Works?
  • Ways to Detect an Intrusion
  • Types of Intrusion Detection Systems
  • System Integrity Verifiers (SIV)
  • General Indications of Intrusions
  • General Indications of System Intrusions
  • Firewall
  • Firewall Architecture
  • DeMilitarized Zone (DMZ)
  • Types of Firewall
  • Packet Filtering Firewall
  • Circuit-Level Gateway Firewall
  • Application-Level Firewall
  • Stateful Multilayer Inspection Firewall
  • Firewall Identification
  • Port Scanning
  • Firewalking
  • Banner Grabbing
  • Honeypot
  • Types of Honeypots
  • How to Set Up a Honeypot?
  • Intrusion Detection Tool
  • Snort
  • Snort Rules
  • Rule Actions and IP Protocols
  • The Direction Operator and IP Addresses
  • Port Numbers
  • Intrusion Detection Systems: Tipping Point
  • Intrusion Detection Tools
  • Firewall: Sunbelt Personal Firewall
  • Firewalls
  • Honeypot Tools
  • KFSensor
  • SPECTER
  • Insertion Attack
  • Evasion
  • Denial-of-Service Attack (DoS)
  • Obfuscating
  • False Positive Generation
  • Session Splicing
  • Unicode Evasion Technique
  • Fragmentation Attack
  • Overlapping Fragments
  • Time-To-Live Attacks
  • Invalid RST Packets
  • Urgency Flag
  • Polymorphic Shellcode
  • ASCII Shellcode
  • Application-Layer Attacks
  • Desynchronization
  • Pre Connection SYN
  • Post Connection SYN
  • Other Types of Evasion
  • IP Address Spoofing
  • Attacking Session Token Generation Mechanism
  • Tiny Fragments
  • Bypass Blocked Sites Using IP Address in Place of URL
  • Bypass Blocked Sites Using Anonymous Website Surfing Sites
  • Bypass a Firewall using Proxy Server
  • Bypassing Firewall through ICMP Tunneling Method
  • Bypassing Firewall through ACK Tunneling Method
  • Bypassing Firewall through HTTP Tunneling Method
  • Bypassing Firewall through External Systems
  • Bypassing Firewall through MITM Attack
  • Detecting Honeypots
  • Honeypot Detecting Tool: Send-Safe Honeypot Hunter
  • Firewall Evasion Tools
  • Traffic IQ Professional
  • tcp-over-dns
  • Firewall Evasion Tools

 

  • Packet Fragment Generators
  • Countermeasures
  • Firewall/IDS Penetration Testing
  • Firewall Penetration Testing
  • IDS Penetration Testing

 

Module 17: Buffer Overflow

  • Buffer Overflows
  • Why are Programs And Applications Vulnerable?
  • Understanding Stacks
  • Stack-Based Buffer Overflow
  • Understanding Heap
  • Heap-Based Buffer Overflow
  • Stack Operations
  • Shellcode
  • No Operations (NOPs)
  • Knowledge Required to Program Buffer Overflow Exploits
  • Buffer Overflow Steps
  • Attacking a Real Program
  • Format String Problem
  • Overflow using Format String
  • Smashing the Stack
  • Once the Stack is Smashed...
  • Simple Uncontrolled Overflow
  • Simple Buffer Overflow in C
  • Code Analysis
  • Exploiting Semantic Comments in C (Annotations)
  • How to Mutate a Buffer Overflow Exploit?
  • Identifying Buffer Overflows
  • How to Detect Buffer Overflows in a Program?
  • BOU (Buffer Overflow Utility)
  • Testing for Heap Overflow Conditions: heap.exe
  • Steps for Testing for Stack Overflow in OllyDbg Debugger
  • Testing for Stack Overflow in OllyDbg Debugger
  • Testing for Format String Conditions using IDA Pro
  • BoF Detection Tools
  • Defense Against Buffer Overflows
  • Preventing BoF Attacks
  • Programming Countermeasures
  • Data Execution Prevention (DEP)
  • Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit (EMET)
  • EMET System Configuration Settings
  • EMET Application Configuration Window
  • /GS http://microsoft.com
  • BoF Security Tools
  • BufferShield
  • Buffer Overflow Penetration Testing

 

Module 18: Cryptography

  • Cryptography
  • Types of Cryptography
  • Government Access to Keys (GAK)
  • Ciphers
  • Advanced Encryption Standard (AES)
  • Data Encryption Standard (DES)
  • RC4, RC5, RC6 Algorithms
  • The DSA and Related Signature Schemes
  • RSA (Rivest Shamir Adleman)
  • Example of RSA Algorithm
  • The RSA Signature Scheme
  • Message Digest (One-way Bash) Functions
  • Message Digest Function: MD5
  • Secure Hashing Algorithm (SHA)
  • What is SSH (Secure Shell)?
  • MD5 Hash Calculators: HashCalc, MD5 Calculator and HashMyFiles
  • Cryptography Tool: Advanced Encryption Package
  • Cryptography Tools
  • Public Key Infrastructure (PKI)
  • Certification Authorities
  • Digital Signature
  • SSL (Secure Sockets Layer)
  • Transport Layer Security (TLS)
  • Disk Encryption
  • Disk Encryption Tool: TrueCrypt
  • Disk Encryption Tools
  • Cryptography Attacks
  • Code Breaking Methodologies
  • Brute-Force Attack
  • Meet-in-the-Middle Attack on Digital Signature Schemes
  • Cryptanalysis Tool: CrypTool
  • Cryptanalysis Tools
  • Online MD5 Decryption Tool

 

Module 19: Penetration Testing

  • Introduction to Penetration Testing
  • Security Assessments
  • Vulnerability Assessment
  • Limitations of Vulnerability Assessment
  • Penetration Testing
  • Why Penetration Testing?
  • What Should be Tested?
  • What Makes a Good Penetration Test?
  • ROI on Penetration Testing
  • Testing Points
  • Testing Locations

 

  • Types of Penetration Testing
  • External Penetration Testing
  • Internal Security Assessment
  • Black-box Penetration Testing
  • Grey-box Penetration Testing
  • White-box Penetration Testing
  • Announced / Unannounced Testing
  • Automated Testing
  • Manual Testing
  • Common Penetration Testing Techniques
  • Using DNS Domain Name and IP Address Information
  • Enumerating Information about Hosts on Publicly-Available Networks
  • Phases of Penetration Testing
  • Pre-Attack Phase
  • Attack Phase
  • Activity: Perimeter Testing
  • Enumerating Devices
  • Activity: Acquiring Target
  • Activity: Escalating Privileges
  • Activity: Execute, Implant, and Retract
  • Post-Attack Phase and Activities
  • Penetration Testing Deliverable Templates
  • Penetration Testing Methodology
  • Application Security Assessment
  • Web Application Testing - I
  • Web Application Testing - II
  • Web Application Testing - III
  • Network Security Assessment
  • Wireless/Remote Access Assessment
  • Wireless Testing
  • Telephony Security Assessment
  • Social Engineering
  • Testing Network-Filtering Devices
  • Denial of Service Emulation
  • Outsourcing Penetration Testing Services
  • Terms of Engagement
  • Project Scope
  • Pentest Service Level Agreements
  • Penetration Testing Consultants
  • Evaluating Different Types of Pentest Tools
  • Application Security Assessment Tool
  • Webscarab
  • Network Security Assessment Tool
  • Angry IP scanner
  • GFI LANguard
  • Wireless/Remote Access Assessment Tool
  • Kismet
  • Telephony Security Assessment Tool

 

  • Omnipeek
  • Testing Network-Filtering Device Tool
  • Traffic IQ Professional

Prerequisite

Linux System Administration, Computer Security Fundamentals, Networking Fundamentals.

Price Includes International Curriculum Courseware And Very Active Real-Time Labs.

Recommended Courses and Certification:
₵1,400.00
CISA (CISA)

CISA

Enhance your career by earning CISA—world-renowned as the standard of achievement for those who audit, control, monitor and assess information technology and business systems. With 140,000 constituents in 200 countries, ISACA is internationally recognized as a high-performing organization that addresses global, national and local information systems and business issues.

Participants will learn the techniques and gain the knowledge necessary to complete the task. They will also learn how to decode the technical situation and report on compliance using accurate, non-technical facts.

The training will focus on preparing students through a combination of lectures, review, drill sessions, extensive mentoring, practice question and answer sessions. It would also provide the right amount of training for participants to pass with confidence.

This course is ideal for

  • Auditors
  • Chartered Accountants
  • Information Security Professionals
  • Management Consultants
  • System Administrators
  • or other individuals considering the CISA examination

The job practice domains and task and knowledge statements are as follows

  • Domain 1—The Process of Auditing Information Systems (21%)
  • Domain 2—Governance and Management of IT (16%)
  • Domain 3—Information Systems Acquisition, Development and Implementation (18%)
  • Domain 4—Information Systems Operations, Maintenance and Service Management (20%)
  • Domain 5—Protection of Information Assets (25%)

Price Includes International Curriculum Courseware And Very Active Real-Time Labs.

2 Hours Daily 3 Times a Week

Total Duration 4 Months

Prerequisites

  • Good Computer Knowledge and Intermediate Security
₵4,000.00
Computer Hacking Forensics Investigator (CHFI)

COURSE OVERVIEW

EC-Council released the most advanced computer forensic investigation program in the world. This course covers major forensic investigation scenarios that enable you to acquire hands-on experience on various forensic investigation techniques and standard tools necessary to successfully carry-out a computer forensic investigation.

Battles between corporations, governments, and countries are no longer fought using physical force. Cyber war has begun and the consequences can be seen in everyday life. With the onset of sophisticated cyber attacks, the need for advanced cybersecurity and investigation training is critical. If you or your organization requires the knowledge or skills to identify, track, and prosecute cyber criminals, then this is the course for you. You will learn how to excel in digital evidence acquisition, handling, and forensically sound analysis. These skills will lead to successful prosecutions in various types of security incidents such as data breaches, corporate espionage, insider threats, and other intricate cases involving computer systems.

TARGET AUDIENCE

  1. The computer forensic investigation process and the various legal issues involved
  2. Evidence searching, seizing and acquisition methodologies in a legal and forensically sound manner
  3. Types of digital evidence, rules of evidence, digital evidence examination process, and electronic crime and digital evidence consideration by crime category
  4. Roles of the first responder, first responder toolkit, securing and evaluating electronic crime scene, conducting preliminary interviews, documenting electronic crime scene, collecting and preserving electronic evidence, packaging and transporting electronic evidence, and reporting the crime scene
  5. Setting up a computer forensics lab and the tools involved in it
  6. Various file systems and how to boot a disk
  7. Gathering volatile and non-volatile information from Windows
  8. Data acquisition and duplication rules
  9. Validation methods and tools required
  10. Recovering deleted files and deleted partitions in Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux
  11. Forensic investigation using AccessData FTK and EnCase
  12. Steganography and its techniques
  13. Steganalysis and image file forensics
  14. Password cracking concepts, tools, and types of password attacks
  15. Investigating password protected files
  16. Types of log capturing, log management, time synchronization, and log capturing tools
  17. Investigating logs, network traffic, wireless attacks, and web attacks
  18. Tracking emails and investigate email crimes
  19. Mobile forensics and mobile forensics software and hardware tools
  20. Writing investigative reports

COURSE OBJECTIVES

1. Computer Forensics in Today's World 
2. Computer Forensics Investigation Process 
3. Searching and Seizing Computers 
4. Digital Evidence 
5. First Responder Procedures 
6. Computer Forensics Lab 
7. Understanding Hard Disks and File Systems 
8. Windows Forensics 
9. Data Acquisition and Duplication 
10. Recovering Deleted Files and Deleted Partitions 
11. Forensics Investigation Using AccessData FTK 
12. Forensics Investigation Using EnCase 
13. Steganography and Image File Forensics 
14. Application Password Crackers 
15. Log Capturing and Event Correlation 
16. Network Forensics, Investigating Logs and Investigating Network Traffic 
17. Investigating Wireless Attacks 
18. Investigating Web Attacks 
19. Tracking Emails and Investigating Email Crimes 
20. Mobile Forensics 
21. Investigative Reports 
22. Becoming an Expert Witness


Classroom Live Labs

Lab 1: Computer Forensics in Today's World
Lab 2: Learning about Computer Crime Policies, Programs, and Computer Forensics Laws
Lab 3: Reporting a Cybercrime to the FBI 
Lab 4: Case Study: Child Pornography
Lab 5: Additional Reading Material
Lab 6: Computer Forensics Investigation Process
Lab 7: Recovering Data Using the Recover My Files Tool
Lab 8: Performing Hash, Checksum, or HMAC Calculations Using the HashCalc Tool
Lab 9: Generating MD5 Hashes Using MD5 Calculator
Lab 10: Additional Reading Material
Lab 11: Searching and Seizing Computers with a Search Warrant
Lab 12: Understanding an Application for a Search Warrant (Exhibit A)
Lab 13: Additional Reading Material
Lab 14: Studying the Digital Evidence Examination Process - Case Study 1 
Lab 15: Studying Digital Evidence Examination Process - Case Study 2
Lab 16: Additional Reading Material
Lab 17: Studying First Responder Procedures 
Lab 18: Understanding the First Responder Toolkit
Lab 19: Additional Reading Material
Lab 20: Computer Forensics Lab
Lab 21: Gathering Evidence Using the Various Tools of DataLifter
Lab 22: Viewing Files of Various Formats Using the File Viewer Tool
Lab 23: Handling Evidence Data Using the P2 Commander Tool
Lab 24: Creating a Disk Image File of a Hard Disk Partition Using the R-Drive Image Tool
Lab 25: Additional Reading Material
Lab 26: Understanding Hard Disks and File Systems
Lab 27: Recovering Deleted Files from Hard Disks Using WinHex
Lab 28: Analyzing File System Types Using The Sleuth Kit (TSK)
Lab 29: Case Study: Corporate Espionage
Lab 30: Additional Reading Material
Lab 31: Performing Windows Forensics
Lab 32: Discovering and Extracting Hidden Forensic Material on Computers Using OSForensics
Lab 33: Extracting Information about Loaded Processes Using Process Explorer
Lab 34: Investigating Metadata Using Metadata Analyzer
Lab 35: Viewing, Monitoring, and Analyzing Events Using the Event Log Explorer Tool
Lab 36: Performing a Computer Forensic Investigation Using the Helix Tool
Lab 37: Case Study: Terrorist Attack
Lab 38: Case Study: Brutal Murder
Lab 39: Forensics Challenge: Banking Troubles
Lab 40: Additional Reading Material
Lab 41: Data Acquisition and Duplication
Lab 42: Investigating NTFS Drive Using DiskExplorer for NTFS
Lab 43: Viewing Content of Forensic Image Using AccessData FTK Imager Tool
Lab 44: Searching Text Strings in the Hard Disk Partition Image Using DriveLook
Lab 45: Forensics Challenge: Forensic Analysis of a Compromised Server
Lab 46: Additional Reading Material
Lab 47: Recovering Deleted Files and Deleted Partitions
Lab 48: File Recovery Using EASEUS Data Recovery Wizard
Lab 49: File Recovery Using Quick Recovery Tool
Lab 50: Partition Recovery Using MiniTool Power Data Recovery Tool
Lab 51: Case Study: Employee Sabotage
Lab 52: Case Study: Virus Attack
Lab 53: Additional Reading Material
Lab 54: Forensics Investigation
Lab 55: Investigating a Case Using AccessData FTK
Lab 56: Case Study: Business Rivalry
Lab 57: Case Study: Sabotage
Lab 58: Forensics Investigation Using EnCase
Lab 59: Case Study: Disaster Recovery Investigation
Lab 60: Performing a Steganalysis and Forensics of an Image File
Lab 61: Analyzing Images for Hidden Messages Using Stegdetect
Lab 62: Analyzing Image File Headers Using Hex Workshop
Lab 63: Identifying Image File Format Using IrfanView
Lab 64: Recovering Photo Evidence from a Raw File Using Adroit Photo Forensics 2011
Lab 65: Case Study: Steganography
Lab 66: Forensics Challenge: Malware Reverse Engineering
Lab 67: Additional Reading Material
Lab 68: Application Password Crackers
Lab 69: Cracking Password Using the Password Recovery Bundle Tool
Lab 70: Cracking Password Using the Advanced Office Password Recovery Tool
Lab 71: Password Cracking Using the Advanced PDF Password Recovery Tool
Lab 72: Cracking Password Using KRyLack Archive Password Recovery Tool
Lab 73: Password Cracking Using the Windows Password Breaker Tool
Lab 74: Case Study: Encrypted Documents
Lab 75: Additional Reading Material
Lab 76: Capturing and Analyzing Log Files
Lab 77: Capturing and Analyzing the Logs of a Computer using GFI EventsManager Tool
Lab 78: Investigating System Log Data Using XpoLog Center Suite Tool
Lab 79: Viewing Event Logs Using Kiwi Syslog Server Tool
Lab 80: Forensics Challenge: Log Mysteries
Lab 81: Additional Reading Material
Lab 82: Network Forensics
Lab 83: Capturing and Analyzing Live Data Packets Using Wireshark Tool
Lab 84: Analyzing a Network Using the Colasoft Capsa Network Analyzer Tool
Lab 85: Monitoring the Network and Capturing Live Traffic Using NetWitness Investigator Tool
Lab 86: Forensics Challenge: Pcap Attack Trace
Lab 87: Additional Reading Material
Lab 88: Investigating Wireless Attacks
Lab 89: Cracking a WEP Network with Aircrack-ng for Windows
Lab 90: Sniffing the Network Using the OmniPeek Network Analyzer
Lab 91: Forensics Challenge: VoIP
Lab 92: Additional Reading Material
Lab 93: Investigating Web Attacks
Lab 94: Finding Web Security Vulnerabilities Using N-Stalker Web Application Security Scanner
Lab 95: Analyzing Domain and IP Address Queries Using SmartWhois Tool
Lab 96: Case Study: Trademark Infringement
Lab 97: Forensics Challenge: Browsers Under Attack
Lab 98: Additional Reading Material
Lab 99: Investigating Email Crimes
Lab 100: Recovering Deleted Emails Using the Recover My Email Utility
Lab 101: Investigating Email Crimes Using Paraben's Email Examiner Tool
Lab 102: Tracing an Email Using the eMailTrackerPro Tool
Lab 103: Case Study: Racial Discrimination
Lab 104: Forensics Challenge: Analyzing Malicious Portable Destructive Files
Lab 105: Additional Reading Material
Lab 106: Mobile Forensics
Lab 107: Investigating Mobile Information Using Oxygen Forensic Suite 2011
Lab 108: Case Study: iP od - A Handy Tool for Crime
Lab 109: Additional Reading Material
Lab 110: Investigative Reports
Lab 111: Creating an Investigative Report Using ProDiscover Tool
Lab 112: Case Study: Pornography
Lab 113: Additional Reading Material
Lab 114: Studying about Computerlegalexperts.com
Lab 115: Finding a Computer Forensics Expert
Lab 116: Understand to Becoming an Expert Witness
Lab 117: Case Study: Expert Witness Expert Witness
Lab 118: Additional Reading Material
Lab 119: Analyzing Al-Qaida Hard Disk Using Various Forensics Tools

COURSE PREREQUISITES

It is strongly recommended that you attend Certified Ethical Hacker v8 before enrolling into CHFI program

Certified Ethical Hacker v9

TEST CERTIFICATION

Computer Hacking Forensic Investigator (CHFI v9) certification

The CHFI program provides you one voucher to sit for the CHFI v 9 exam.

Schedule for Computer Hacking Forensics Investigator
CourseExam
Computer Hacking Forensic InvestigatorEC0 312-49

2 Hours Daily 3 Times a Week

Total Duration 4 Months 

Our Services

₵3,200.00
EC Council Certified Security Analys (ECSA)

EC Council Certified Security Analys

Overview
The ECSA program offers a seamless learning progress continuing where the CEH program left off.

The new ECSAv10 includes updated curricula and an industry recognized comprehensive step-bystep penetration testing methodology. This allows a learner to elevate their ability in applying new skills learned through intensive practical labs and challenges.

Unlike most other pen testing programs that only follow a generic kill chain methodology; the ECSA presents a set of distinguishable comprehensive methodologies that are able to cover different
pentesting requirements across different verticals.

It is a highly interactive, comprehensive, standards based, intensive training program that teaches information security professionals how professional real-life penetration testing are conducted.

Building on the knowledge, skills and abilities covered in the new CEH v10 program, we have simultaneously re-engineered the ECSA program as a progression from the former.

Organizations today demand a professional level pentesting program and not just pentesting programs that provide training on how to hack through applications and networks.

Such professional level programs can only be achieved when the core of the curricula maps with and is compliant to government and/or industry published pentesting frameworks.

This course is a part of the VAPT Track of EC-Council. This is a “Professional” level course, with the Certified Ethical Hacker being the “Core” and the Licensed Penetration Tester being the “Master” level
certification.

In the new ECSAv10 course, students that passes the knowledge exam are given an option to pursue a fully practical exam that provides an avenue for them to test their skills, earning them the ECSA (Practical) credential. This new credential allows employers to validate easily the skills of the student.

Who Should Attend
Ethical Hackers, Penetration Testers, Security Analysts, Security Engineers, Network Server Administrators, Firewall Administrators, Security Testers, System Administrators, and Risk Assessment Professionals.

ECSA Exam
The ECSA exam aims to test a candidate’s knowledge and application of critical penetration testing methodologies.
Candidates that successfully pass the multiple-choice exam will be awarded the ECSA credential.

As a powerful addition to the ECSA exam, the new ECSA (Practical) exam is now available adding even more value to the ECSA certification.

At the end of SKYWATCH TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE class, students receive the practice test and a voucher for the proctored online ECSA Certification Exam.

Eligibility Criteria for ECSA Exam
• Attend offical training via an EC-Council accedited training channel
Or
• Possess a minimum of 2 years of working experience in a related InfoSec domain

Course Outline

1. Introduction to Penetration Testing and
Methodologies
2. Penetration Testing Scoping and Engagement
Methodology
3. Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) Methodology
4. Social Engineering Penetration Testing
Methodology
5. Network Penetration Testing Methodology -
External
6. Network Penetration Testing Methodology -
Internal
7. Network Penetration Testing Methodology -
Perimeter Devices
8. Web Application Penetration Testing
Methodology
9. Database Penetration Testing Methodology
10. Wireless Penetration Testing Methodology
11. Cloud Penetration Testing Methodology
12. Report Writing and Post Testing Actions

Self Study Modules

1. Penetration Testing Essential Concepts
This is an Essential Prerequisite as it helps you to
prepares you the ECSA courseware. Serves as a
base to build Advanced Pen Testing Concepts
2. Password Cracking Penetration Testing
3. Denial-of-Service Penetration Testing
4. Stolen Laptop, PDAs and Cell Phones Penetration Testing
5. Source Code Penetration Testing
6. Physical Security Penetration Testing
7. Surveillance Camera Penetration Testing
8. VoIP Penetration Testing
9. VPN Penetration Testing
10. Virtual Machine Penetration Testing
11. War Dialing
12. Virus and Trojan Detection
13. Log Management Penetration Testing
14. File Integrity Checking
15. Telecommunication and Broadband Communication Penetration Testing
16. Email Security Penetration Testing
17. Security Patches Penetration Testing
18. Data Leakage Penetration Testing
19. SAP Penetration Testing
20. Standards and Compliance
21. Information System Security Principles
22. Information System Incident Handling and Response
23. Information System Auditing and CertificationConfigure Authentication for EIGRP Routes

Challenge 12: Configure BGP Authentication


Price Includes International Curriculum Courseware And Very Active Real-Time Labs.

4 Hours Daily 3 Times a Week

Total Duration 4 Months

₵1,700.00
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